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Quacks, Lemons, and Self Regulation: A Welfare Analysis

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  • Gehrig, Thomas
  • Jost, Peter-J

Abstract

This paper provides a framework in which suppliers of experience goods may find it in their best interests to provide, and enforce, quality standards. The incentives to form self-regulatory organizations are inversely related to ex-ante monitoring costs of the organization, as well as the number of members. This self-regulatory outcome is compared to statutory price and quality regulation. Without informational asymmetries between market participants and the social planer, self-regulatory outcomes can always be replicated by statutory regulation. Even with asymmetric information, self regulation is socially desirable only if the regulator values firm's profits sufficiently highly. Copyright 1995 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Gehrig, Thomas & Jost, Peter-J, 1995. "Quacks, Lemons, and Self Regulation: A Welfare Analysis," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 309-325, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:7:y:1995:i:3:p:309-25
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    Cited by:

    1. Camille Chaserant & Sophie Harnay, 2011. "Reputation on a credence good market: an economic analysis of professional self-regulation," EconomiX Working Papers 2011-32, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    2. Kolesnik, Georgiy, 2015. "Modelling "race to the bottom" effect on the self-regulated markets," MPRA Paper 64138, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Camille Chaserant & Sophie Harnay, 2015. "Self-regulation of the legal profession and quality in the market for legal services: an economic analysis of lawyers’ reputation," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 431-449, April.
    4. Drusilla K. Brown & Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2009. "U.S. Trade and Other Policy Options and Programs to Deter Foreign Exploitation of Child Labor," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Globalization And International Trade Policies, chapter 18, pages 689-743, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. Andersson, Fredrik & Skogh, Goran, 2003. "Quality, self-regulation, and competition: the case of insurance," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 267-280, April.
    6. Bendikov, Mikhail & Kolesnik, Georgiy, 2013. "Конкуренция Саморегулируемых Организаций И Эффективность Рынков [Self-regulatory organizations competition and the market efficiency]," MPRA Paper 47812, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Buehler, Benno & Schuett, Florian, 2014. "Certification and minimum quality standards when some consumers are uninformed," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 493-511.
    8. Grajzl, Peter & Murrell, Peter, 2007. "Allocating lawmaking powers: Self-regulation vs government regulation," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 520-545, September.
    9. Javier I.Núnez Errázuriz, 2000. "A repeated game of self regulation," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 27(1 Year 20), pages 33-54, June.
    10. Niels Philipsen, 2011. "Professional Licensing and Self-regulation in Europe and China: A Law and Economics Perspective," Chapters, in: Michael Faure & Xinzhu Zhang (ed.),Competition Policy and Regulation, chapter 9, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Cave, Jonathan & Marsden, Christopher, 2008. "Quis custodiet ipsos custodies in the Internet: self-regulation as a threat and a promise," MPRA Paper 83193, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Teisl, Mario F. & Roe, Brian, 1998. "The Economics of Labeling: An Overview of Issues for Health and Environmental Disclosure," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 140-150, October.
    13. Michał Krawczyk & Krzysztof Szczygielski, 2019. "Do professions curb free-riding? An experiment," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 361-376, June.
    14. Silvester Van Koten & Andreas Ortmann, 2016. "Self-Regulatory Organizations under the Shadow of Governmental Oversight: An Experimental Investigation," Research in Experimental Economics, in: Sebastian J. Goerg & John R. Hamman (ed.),Experiments in Organizational Economics, volume 19, pages 85-104, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    15. Heyes, Anthony G., 2005. "A signaling motive for self-regulation in the shadow of coercion," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 238-246.
    16. Camille Chaserant & Sophie Harnay, 2013. "The regulation of quality in the market for legal services: Taking the heterogeneity of legal services seriously," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 10(2), pages 267-291, August.
    17. Grajzl, Peter & Baniak, Andrzej, 2009. "Industry self-regulation, subversion of public institutions, and social control of torts," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 360-374, December.
    18. Drusilla K. Brown, 1999. "Can Consumer Product Labels Deter Foreign Child Labor Exploitation?," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 9919, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    19. Nunez, Javier, 2001. "A model of self-regulation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 91-97, December.

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