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Government growth and private contributions to charity

Author

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  • Thomas Garrett

    ()

  • Russell Rhine

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Garrett & Russell Rhine, 2010. "Government growth and private contributions to charity," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 143(1), pages 103-120, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:143:y:2010:i:1:p:103-120
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-009-9492-1
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11127-009-9492-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Perron, Pierre & Rodriguez, Gabriel, 2003. "GLS detrending, efficient unit root tests and structural change," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 1-27, July.
    2. Andreoni, James, 1989. "Giving with Impure Altruism: Applications to Charity and Ricardian Equivalence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1447-1458, December.
    3. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501.
    4. John D. Benjamin & Peter Chinloy & G. Donald Jud, 2004. "Real Estate Versus Financial Wealth in Consumption," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 341-354, November.
    5. Gerald E. Auten & Holger Sieg & Charles T. Clotfelter, 2002. "Charitable Giving, Income, and Taxes: An Analysis of Panel Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 371-382, March.
    6. Glazer, Amihai & Konrad, Kai A, 1996. "A Signaling Explanation for Charity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 1019-1028, September.
    7. Khanna, Jyoti & Posnett, John & Sandler, Todd, 1995. "Charity donations in the UK: New evidence based on panel data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 257-272, February.
    8. Kathleen M. Day & Rose Anne Devlin, 1996. "Volunteerism and Crowding Out: Canadian Econometric Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(1), pages 37-53, February.
    9. Lawrence B. Lindsey & Richard Steinberg, 1990. "Joint Crowdout: An Empirical Study of the Impact of Federal Grants on State Government Expenditures and Charitable Donations," NBER Working Papers 3226, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Timm Bönke & Nima Massarrat-Mashhadi & Christian Sielaff, 2013. "Charitable giving in the German welfare state: fiscal incentives and crowding out," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 154(1), pages 39-58, January.
    2. Franz Hackl & Martin Halla & Gerald Pruckner, 2012. "Volunteering and the state," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 151(3), pages 465-495, June.
    3. Sanjit Dhami & Ali al-Nowaihi, 2011. "Competitive Charitable Giving and Optimal Public Policy with Multiple Equilibria," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/37, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    4. Sanjit Dhami & Ali al-Nowaihi, 2010. "Charitable Giving and Optimal Public Policy in a Competitive Equilibrium with Multiple Equilibria," Discussion Papers in Economics 10/08, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    5. Sanjit Dhami & Ali al-Nowaihi, 2012. "Philanthropy, multiple equilibria and optimal public policy," Discussion Papers in Economics 12/08, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    6. Daniel Jones, 2013. "Education’s gambling problem: The impact of earmarking lottery revenues for education on charitable giving and government spending," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 13/307, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government spending; Charity; Growth; Crowding out; D12; D64; H3;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents

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