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Commodity Prices, Inflationary Pressures, and Monetary Policy: Evidence from BRICS Economies

Listed author(s):
  • Sushanta Mallick

    ()

  • Ricardo Sousa

    ()

We assess the transmission of monetary policy and the impact of fluctuations in commodity prices on the real economy for the five biggest and fastest growing emerging market economies: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS). Using modern econometric techniques, we show that a monetary policy contraction has a negative effect on output, suggesting that it can lean against unexpected macroeconomic shocks even when the financial markets are not well-developed in this group of countries. We also uncover the importance of commodity price shocks, which lead to a rise in inflation and demand an aggressive behaviour from central banks towards inflation stabilisation. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11079-012-9261-5
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Open Economies Review.

Volume (Year): 24 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (September)
Pages: 677-694

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Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:24:y:2013:i:4:p:677-694
DOI: 10.1007/s11079-012-9261-5
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/international+economics/journal/11079/PS2

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