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Nontradable Goods and the Real Exchange Rate

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  • Pau Rabanal

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  • Vicente Tuesta

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Abstract

How important are nontradable goods and distribution costs to explain real exchange rate dynamics? We answer this question by estimating a general equilibrium model with intermediate and final tradable and nontradable goods. We find that the estimated model can match characteristics of the data that are relevant in international macroeconomics, such as real exchange rate persistence and volatility, and the correlation between the real exchange rate and other variables. The distinction between tradable and nontradable goods is key to understand real exchange rate fluctuations, but the introduction of distribution costs is not. Nontradable sector technology shocks explain about one third of real exchange rate volatility. We also show that, in order to explain the low correlation between the ratio of relative consumption and the real exchange rates across countries, demand shocks are necessary. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Pau Rabanal & Vicente Tuesta, 2013. "Nontradable Goods and the Real Exchange Rate," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 495-535, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:24:y:2013:i:3:p:495-535 DOI: 10.1007/s11079-012-9250-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jordi Galí & Pau Rabanal, 2005. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations: How Well Does the Real Business Cycle Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2004, Volume 19, pages 225-318 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Petroulakis, Filippos, 2017. "Internal devaluation in currency unions: the role of trade costs and taxes," Working Paper Series 2049, European Central Bank.
    2. Laura Povoledo, 2016. "Pricing behaviour and the role of trade openness in the transmission of monetary shocks," Working Papers 20161609, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. Paul Castillo & Carlos Montoro & Vicente Tuesta, 2013. "An Estimated Stochastic General Equilibrium Model with Partial Dollarization: A Bayesian Approach," Open Economies Review, Springer, pages 217-265.
    4. Rabanal, Pau & Rubio-Ramírez, Juan F. & Tuesta, Vicente, 2011. "Cointegrated TFP processes and international business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 156-171, March.
    5. Agénor, Pierre-Richard, 2016. "Optimal fiscal management of commodity price shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 183-196.
    6. D. Siena, 2014. "The European Monetary Union and Imbalances: Is it an Anticipation Story ?," Working papers 501, Banque de France.
    7. Stefan Hohberger & Lukas Vogel & Bernhard Herz, 2014. "Budgetary-Neutral Fiscal Policy Rules and External Adjustment," Open Economies Review, Springer, pages 909-936.
    8. Krzysztof MAKARSKI & Michal GRADZEWICZ, "undated". "The Macroeconomic Effects of Losing Autonomous Monetary Policy after the Euro Adoption in Poland," EcoMod2009 21500061, EcoMod.
    9. Hande Kucuk & Alan Sutherland, 2015. "International Risk Sharing and Portfolio Choice with Non-separable Preferences," Working Papers 1517, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    10. Daniel Rees & Penelope Smith & Jamie Hall, 2015. "A Multi-sector Model of the Australian Economy," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2015-07, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    11. Huh , Hyeon-seung & Park, Cyn-Young, 2013. "Examining the Determinants of Food Prices in Developing Asia," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 370, Asian Development Bank.
    12. Paul Castillo & Carlos Montoro & Vicente Tuesta, 2013. "An Estimated Stochastic General Equilibrium Model with Partial Dollarization: A Bayesian Approach," Open Economies Review, Springer, pages 217-265.
    13. Daniel M. Rees & Penelope Smith & Jamie Hall, 2016. "A Multi-sector Model of the Australian Economy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(298), pages 374-408, September.
    14. Riccardo Cristadoro & Andrea Gerali & Stefano Neri & Massimiliano Pisani, 2008. "Real exchange rate volatility and disconnect: an empirical investigation," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 660, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    15. Hohberger, Stefan & Kraus, Lena, 2015. "Is fiscal devaluation welfare enhancing? A model-based analysis," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113193, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    16. Aydan Dogan, 2014. "Euro- US Real Exchange Rate Dynamics: How Far Can We Push Equilibrium Models?," Studies in Economics 1409, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    17. repec:eee:ecolet:v:161:y:2017:i:c:p:66-70 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Óscar Afonso & Tiago Sequeira, 2017. "Tradable and nontradable directed technical change," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2017_02, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).
    19. Agénor, Pierre-Richard, 2016. "Optimal fiscal management of commodity price shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 183-196.
    20. Shim, Jae-Hun, 2016. "Monetary Policy in the Small Open Economy with Market Segmentation," Department of Economics Working Papers 58128, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
    21. Nikolay Hristov, 2016. "The Ifo DSGE Model for the German Economy," ifo Working Paper Series 210, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Real exchange rates; Nontradable goods; Nominal rigidities; Bayesian estimation; F31; F32; F41; C11;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General

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