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Immigration and productivity: a Spanish tale

Author

Listed:
  • Alicia Gómez–Tello

    (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

  • Rosella Nicolini

    () (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

Abstract

Abstract This paper analyses the extent to which changes in labour composition may affect variation in productivity in Spain. With an original and novel database, we track recently recorded changes in productivity to investigate how the entry of immigrants into the domestic labour market affects productivity. In a few specific situations, our results show that immigrants play the role of environment builders, who bring expertise necessary to fostering productivity and encouraging further improvements in productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Alicia Gómez–Tello & Rosella Nicolini, 2017. "Immigration and productivity: a Spanish tale," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 167-183, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jproda:v:47:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11123-017-0499-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s11123-017-0499-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour productivity; Human capital; Immigrants;

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production

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