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On the aggregate effects of immigration in Spain


  • Mario Izquierdo
  • Juan Jimeno
  • Juan Rojas



This paper presents a dynamic general equilibrium model designed to compute the aggregate impact of immigration, accounting for relevant supply and demand effects. We calibrate the model to the Spanish economy, allowing for enough heterogeneity in the demographic characteristics of immigrant and native workers. We consider an initial steady state characterized by the age structure of the Spanish population in 1995 and study the effects of several immigration scenarios on several macroeconomic variables (GDP, employment, productivity, etc.).
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Suggested Citation

  • Mario Izquierdo & Juan Jimeno & Juan Rojas, 2010. "On the aggregate effects of immigration in Spain," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 1(4), pages 409-432, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:series:v:1:y:2010:i:4:p:409-432 DOI: 10.1007/s13209-010-0021-8

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 2000. " Unskilled Migration: A Burden or a Boon for the Welfare State?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 102(3), pages 463-479, June.
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    4. Juan F. Jimeno & Esther Moral & Lorena Saiz, 2006. "Structural breaks in labor productivity growth: the United States vs. the European Union," Working Papers 0625, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    5. Rojas, Juan A., 2005. "Life-cycle earnings, cohort size effects and social security: a quantitative exploration," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2-3), pages 465-485, February.
    6. Burnside, Craig & Eichenbaum, Martin & Fisher, Jonas D. M., 2004. "Fiscal shocks and their consequences," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 89-117, March.
    7. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    8. Ottaviano, Gianmarco & Peri, Giovanni, 2005. "Rethinking the Gains from Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the US," CEPR Discussion Papers 5226, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Javier Diaz-Gimenez & Julian Diaz-Saavedra, 2009. "Delaying Retirement in Spain," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(1), pages 147-167, January.
    10. M. Dolores Collado & IÒigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe & Guadalupe Valera, 2004. "Quantifying the Impact of Immigration on the Spanish Welfare State," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 11(3), pages 335-353, May.
    11. Fabio Canova & Morten Ravn, 2000. "The Macroeconomic Effects of German Unification: Real Adjustments and the Welfare State," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 3(3), pages 423-460, July.
    12. Borjas, George J., 1999. "The economic analysis of immigration," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1697-1760 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lange, Fabian & Gollin, Douglas, 2007. "Equipping Immigrants: Migration Flows and Capital Movements," IZA Discussion Papers 2745, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Alicia Gómez–Tello & Rosella Nicolini, 2017. "Immigration and productivity: a Spanish tale," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 167-183, April.
    3. Maravall, A. & del Rio, A., 2007. "Temporal aggregation, systematic sampling, and the Hodrick-Prescott filter," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 975-998, October.
    4. Johannes Berger & Thomas Davoine & Philip Schuster & Ludwig Strohner, 2016. "Cross-country differences in the contribution of future migration to old-age financing," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(6), pages 1160-1184, December.
    5. Stephen Nickell, 2010. "Immigration: trends and macroeconomic implications," BIS Papers chapters,in: Globalisation, labour markets and international adjustment - Essays in honour of Palle S Andersen, volume 50, pages 51-63 Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Carrasco, Raquel & Jimeno, Juan F. & Ortega, Ana Carolina, 2008. "The impact of immigration on the wage structure : Spain 1995-2002," UC3M Working papers. Economics we080603, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    7. Boldrin, Michele & Montes, Ana, 2015. "Modeling an immigration shock," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 190-206.
    8. Isabel Argimón & Pablo Hernández de Cos, 2008. "The determinants of budget balances of the regional (Autonomous) governments," Working Papers 0803, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    9. Douglas Gollin & Eric Van Dusen & Harvey Blackburn, 2008. "Animal genetic resource trade flows: Economic assessment," Center for Development Economics 2008-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    10. Nicodemo, Catia, 2013. "Immigration and Labor Productivity: New Empirical Evidence for Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 7297, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Clara Isabel González & J. Ignacio Conde-Ruiz & Michele Boldrin, 2008. "Immigration and Social Security in Spain," Working Papers 2008-36, FEDEA.
    12. Aitor Erce, 2008. "A structural model of sovereign debt issuance: assessing the role of financial factors," Working Papers 0809, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    13. Douglas Gollin & Fabian Lange, 2013. "Equipping immigrants: migration flows and capital movements in small open economies," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(4), pages 749-777, December.
    14. Ian Dew-Becker & Robert J. Gordon, 2008. "The Role of Labor Market Changes in the Slowdown of European Productivity Growth," NBER Working Papers 13840, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. William Wascher, 2010. "Discussion comments on "Immigration: trends and macroeconomic implications"," BIS Papers chapters,in: Globalisation, labour markets and international adjustment - Essays in honour of Palle S Andersen, volume 50, pages 69-75 Bank for International Settlements.
    16. Fusshoeller, Chantal & Balleer, Almut, 2017. "Migration and investment: a business cycle perspective," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168125, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. Mahia, Ramon & de Arce, Rafael & Thielemann, Eiko, 2010. "Immigration policy and its impact a comparative study with a focus on Spain," MPRA Paper 35742, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. K. Burggraeve & C. Piton, 2016. "The economic consequences of the flow of refugees into Belgium," Economic Review, National Bank of Belgium, issue i, pages 43-61, June.
    19. Martínez i Coma, Ferran & Duval Hernández, Robert, 2009. "Hostility Toward Immigration in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 4109, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    20. Danilo Leiva-Leon, 2017. "Monitoring the Spanish Economy through the Lenses of Structural Bayesian VARs," Occasional Papers 1706, Banco de España;Occasional Papers Homepage.

    More about this item


    Overlapping generations; Immigration; E20; J10;

    JEL classification:

    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration


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