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Family Income and Students' Mobility

  • Patrizia Ordine
  • Claudio Lupi


    (University of Calabria, Dept. of Economics and Statistics
    University of Molise, Dept. of Economics)

This paper investigates the reasons that determine students’ mobility in Italy and tries to explain why in the presence of quality differentials among universities the majority of students choose to remain in their regions of origin. We find that low mobility is related to family income and other financial and background characteristics. Low mobility in turn implies the existence of little competition among universities, and hence little incentive for improvement in either teaching or research. A crucial issue is therefore to evaluate if and how the government may affect this process and improve the supply of higher education quality and the degree of competition among academic institutions.

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Article provided by GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University in its journal Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia.

Volume (Year): 68 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages: 1-23

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Handle: RePEc:gde:journl:gde_v68_n1_p1-23
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