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Fuelwood Savings and Carbon Emission Reductions by the Use of Improved Cooking Stoves in an Afromontane Forest, Ethiopia

Author

Listed:
  • Elisabeth Dresen

    () (GeoSYS Ltd., Nansenstrasse 17, D-12047 Berlin, Germany)

  • Ben DeVries

    () (Laboratory of Geo-Information Science and Remote Sensing, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 3, Wageningen 6708PB, The Netherlands)

  • Martin Herold

    () (Laboratory of Geo-Information Science and Remote Sensing, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 3, Wageningen 6708PB, The Netherlands)

  • Louis Verchot

    () (Center for International Forest Research (CIFOR), PO Box 0113 BOCBD, Bogor 16000, Indonesia)

  • Robert Müller

    () (Department of Landscape Ecology, Institute of Geography, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Goldschmidtstr. 5, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany)

Abstract

In many Sub-Saharan African countries, fuelwood collection is among the most important drivers of deforestation and particularly forest degradation. In a detailed field study in the Kafa region of southern Ethiopia, we assessed the potential of efficient cooking stoves to mitigate the negative impacts of fuelwood harvesting on forests. Eleven thousand improved cooking stoves (ICS), specifically designed for baking Ethiopia’s staple food injera , referred to locally as “ Mirt ” stoves, have been distributed here. We found a high acceptance rate of the stove. One hundred forty interviews, including users and non-users of the ICS, revealed fuelwood savings of nearly 40% in injera preparation compared to the traditional three-stone fire, leading to a total annual savings of 1.28 tons of fuelwood per household. Considering the approximated share of fuelwood from unsustainable sources, these savings translate to 11,800 tons of CO 2 saved for 11,156 disseminated ICS, corresponding to the amount of carbon stored in over 30 ha of local forest. We further found that stove efficiency increased with longer injera baking sessions, which shows a way of optimizing fuelwood savings by adapted usage of ICS. Our study confirms that efficient cooking stoves, if well adapted to the local cooking habits, can make a significant contribution to the conservation of forests and the avoidance of carbon emission from forest clearing and degradation.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisabeth Dresen & Ben DeVries & Martin Herold & Louis Verchot & Robert Müller, 2014. "Fuelwood Savings and Carbon Emission Reductions by the Use of Improved Cooking Stoves in an Afromontane Forest, Ethiopia," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(3), pages 1-21, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jlands:v:3:y:2014:i:3:p:1137-1157:d:40271
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alem, Yonas & Hassen, Sied & Kohlin, Gunnar, 2013. "The Dynamics of Electric Cookstove Adoption: Panel Data Evidence from Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-13-03-efd, Resources For the Future.
    2. Bensch, Gunther & Peters, Jörg, 2011. "Combating Deforestation? – Impacts of Improved Stove Dissemination on Charcoal Consumption in Urban Senegal," Ruhr Economic Papers 306, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Takahashi, Ryo & Todo, Yasuyuki, 2011. "Impact of Community Management on Forest Protection:Evidence from an Aid-Funded Project in Ethiopia," Working Papers 31, JICA Research Institute.
    4. Gurung, Anup & Oh, Sang Eun, 2013. "Conversion of traditional biomass into modern bioenergy systems: A review in context to improve the energy situation in Nepal," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 206-213.
    5. Nepal, Mani & Nepal, Apsara & Grimsrud, Kristine, 2011. "Unbelievable but improved cookstoves are not helpful in reducing firewood demand in Nepal," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(01), pages 1-23, February.
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    1. repec:eee:resene:v:52:y:2018:i:c:p:173-185 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ethiopia; Kafa Biosphere Reserve; improved cooking stoves; “ Mirt ” stove; fuelwood; carbon;

    JEL classification:

    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • R52 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Land Use and Other Regulations

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