IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

European Markets’ Reactions to Exogenous Shocks: A High Frequency Data Analysis of the 2005 London Bombings

  • Christos Kollias

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Thessaly, Korai 43, Volos 38333, Greece)

  • Stephanos Papadamou

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Thessaly, Korai 43, Volos 38333, Greece)

  • Costas Siriopoulos

    ()

    (Department of Business Administration, University of Patras, Rio, Patras 26504, Greece)

Terrorist incidents exert a negative, albeit usually short-lived, impact on markets and equity returns. Given the integration of global financial markets, mega-terrorist events also have a high contagion potential with their shock waves being transmitted across countries and markets. This paper investigates the cross-market transmission of the London Stock Exchange’s reaction to the terrorist attacks of 2005. It focuses on how this reaction was transmitted to two other major European stock exchanges: Frankfurt and Paris. To this effect, high frequency intraday data are used and multivariate Genralised Autorgressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models are employed. This type of data help reveal a more accurate picture of markets’ reaction to exogenous shocks, such as a terrorist attack, and thus allow more reliable inferences. Findings reported herein indicate that the volatility of stock market returns is increased in all cases examined.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2227-7072/1/4/154/pdf
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2227-7072/1/4/154/
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal International Journal of Financial Studies.

Volume (Year): 1 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 154-167

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:gam:jijfss:v:1:y:2013:i:4:p:154-167:d:30524
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.mdpi.com/

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Kristin Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 1999. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence: Measuring Stock Market Co-movements," NBER Working Papers 7267, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Nikolaus Hautsch & Dieter Hess & David Veredas, 2011. "The impact of macroeconomic news on quote adjustments, noise and informational volatility," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/136190, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. Härdle, Wolfgang Karl & Hautsch, Nikolaus & Mihoci, Andrija, 2012. "Modelling and forecasting liquidity supply using semiparametric factor dynamics," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 610-625.
  4. Christos Kollias & Stephanos Papadamou & Vangelis Arvanitis, 2013. "Symposium - Does Terrorism Affect the Stock-Bond Covariance? Evidence from European Countries," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 832-848, April.
  5. Longin, Francois & Solnik, Bruno, 1995. "Is the correlation in international equity returns constant: 1960-1990?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 3-26, February.
  6. William N. Goetzmann & Lingfeng Li & K. Geert Rouwenhorst, 2001. "Long-Term Global Market Correlations," NBER Working Papers 8612, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Chesney, Marc & Reshetar, Ganna & Karaman, Mustafa, 2011. "The impact of terrorism on financial markets: An empirical study," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 253-267, February.
  8. Drakos, Konstantinos, 2010. "Terrorism activity, investor sentiment, and stock returns," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 128-135, August.
  9. Connolly, Robert A. & Wang, F. Albert, 2003. "International equity market comovements: Economic fundamentals or contagion?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 23-43, January.
  10. Marcello Pericoli & Massimo Sbracia, 2001. "A Primer on Financial Contagion," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 407, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  11. Mark T. Hon & Jack Strauss & Soo-Keong Yong, 2004. "Contagion in financial markets after September 11: myth or reality?," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 27(1), pages 95-114.
  12. Marie-Aude Laguna & Gunther Capelle-Blancard, 2010. "How Does the Stock Market Respond to Chemical Disasters?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00637961, HAL.
  13. Axel Groß-Klußmann & Nikolaus Hautsch, 2011. "Predicting Bid-Ask Spreads Using Long Memory Autoregressive Conditional Poisson Models," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2011-044, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  14. Bowen, Robert M. & Castanias, Richard P. & Daley, Lane A., 1983. "Intra-Industry Effects of the Accident at Three Mile Island," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(01), pages 87-111, March.
  15. Blose, Laurence E. & Bornkamp, Robin & Brier, Marci & Brown, Kendis & Frederick, Jerry, 1996. "Catastrophic events, contagion, and stock market efficiency: the case of the space shuttle challenger," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 117-129.
  16. Chiang, Thomas C. & Jeon, Bang Nam & Li, Huimin, 2007. "Dynamic correlation analysis of financial contagion: Evidence from Asian markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(7), pages 1206-1228, November.
  17. Jussi Nikkinen & Sami Vähämaa, 2010. "Terrorism and Stock Market Sentiment," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 45(2), pages 263-275, 05.
  18. Charles, Amelie & Darne, Olivier, 2006. "Large shocks and the September 11th terrorist attacks on international stock markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 683-698, July.
  19. Theodossiou, Panayiotis & Lee, Unro, 1993. "Mean and Volatility Spillovers across Major National Stock Markets: Further Empirical Evidence," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 16(4), pages 337-50, Winter.
  20. Fernandez, Viviana, 2008. "The war on terror and its impact on the long-term volatility of financial markets," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-26.
  21. Saleem, Kashif, 2008. "International linkage of the Russian market and the Russian financial crisis: A multivariate GARCH analysis," BOFIT Discussion Papers 8/2008, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  22. Kollias, Christos & Manou, Efthalia & Papadamou, Stephanos & Stagiannis, Apostolos, 2011. "Stock markets and terrorist attacks: Comparative evidence from a large and a small capitalization market," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(S1), pages S64-S77.
  23. Konstantinos Drakos, 2009. "The Determinants of Terrorist Shocks' Cross-Market Transmission," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 17, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  24. Lin, Wen-Ling & Engle, Robert F & Ito, Takatoshi, 1994. "Do Bulls and Bears Move across Borders? International Transmission of Stock Returns and Volatility," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 7(3), pages 507-38.
  25. Ramiah, Vikash & Cam, Marie-Anne & Calabro, Michael & Maher, David & Ghafouri, Shahab, 2010. "Changes in equity returns and volatility across different Australian industries following the recent terrorist attacks," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 64-76, January.
  26. Herbst, Anthony F. & Marshall, John F. & Wingender, John, 1996. "An analysis of the stock market's response to the Exxon Valdez disaster," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 101-114.
  27. Hautsch, Nikolaus & Malec, Peter & Schienle, Melanie, 2011. "Capturing the zero: A new class of zero-augmented distributions and multiplicative error processes," CFS Working Paper Series 2011/25, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  28. Kollias, Christos & Papadamou, Stephanos & Stagiannis, Apostolos, 2011. "Terrorism and capital markets: The effects of the Madrid and London bomb attacks," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 532-541, October.
  29. Hamao, Yasushi & Masulis, Ronald W & Ng, Victor, 1990. "Correlations in Price Changes and Volatility across International Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(2), pages 281-307.
  30. Saleem, Kashif, 2009. "International linkage of the Russian market and the Russian financial crisis: A multivariate GARCH analysis," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 243-256, September.
  31. Kaplanski, Guy & Levy, Haim, 2010. "Sentiment and stock prices: The case of aviation disasters," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 174-201, February.
  32. Ioannis Asimakopoulos & John Goddard & Costas Siriopoulos, 2000. "Interdependence between the US and major European equity markets: evidence from spectral analysis," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 41-47.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jijfss:v:1:y:2013:i:4:p:154-167:d:30524. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.