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Changes in equity returns and volatility across different Australian industries following the recent terrorist attacks

Author

Listed:
  • Ramiah, Vikash
  • Cam, Marie-Anne
  • Calabro, Michael
  • Maher, David
  • Ghafouri, Shahab

Abstract

We investigate the impact of five recent terrorist attacks on equities listed on the Australian Stock Exchange. Following the Global Industry Classification Standard, we analyse how these events affect the different sectors in Australia. Using parametric and non-parametric tests, we investigate the relationship between stock returns for equities listed in these sectors and terrorist attacks. We report significant short term negative abnormal returns around the September 11 attacks and to a lesser extent, the Madrid and London bombings. Our evidence shows a weak positive equity response to the Bali bombing, and no response from the Mumbai attack in the Australian market. We also document negative industry abnormal returns as high as 37.30% on the day in the Utilities sector. Our findings show that systematic risk of certain sectors increased after the events of September 11 but remained unchanged for the other attacks.

Suggested Citation

  • Ramiah, Vikash & Cam, Marie-Anne & Calabro, Michael & Maher, David & Ghafouri, Shahab, 2010. "Changes in equity returns and volatility across different Australian industries following the recent terrorist attacks," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 64-76, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pacfin:v:18:y:2010:i:1:p:64-76
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Christos Kollias & Stephanos Papadamou & Costas Siriopoulos, 2013. "European Markets’ Reactions to Exogenous Shocks: A High Frequency Data Analysis of the 2005 London Bombings," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(4), pages 1-14, November.
    2. Ahmad, Tanveer & Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain & Rehman, Mobeen ur, 2014. "Industry Premiums and Systematic Risk under Terror: Empirical Evidence from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 60082, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Chang, Bisharat & Iqbal, Javed, 2014. "Financial Analysis of Industrial Portfolios in Pakistan: A Comparative Analysis of Pre 9/11 and Post 9/11Period," MPRA Paper 55433, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Marie-Anne Cam & Vikash Ramiah, 2014. "The influence of systematic risk factors and econometric adjustments in catastrophic event studies," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 171-189, February.
    5. Ramiah, Vikash & Martin, Belinda & Moosa, Imad, 2013. "How does the stock market react to the announcement of green policies?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1747-1758.
    6. Arif, Imtiaz & Suleman, Tahir, 2014. "Terrorism and Stock Market Linkages: An Empirical Study from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 58918, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Christos Kollias & Stephanos Papadamou & Vangelis Arvanitis, 2013. "Symposium - Does Terrorism Affect the Stock-Bond Covariance? Evidence from European Countries," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 832-848, April.

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