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Big Questions, Little Answers: Terrorism Activity, Investor Sentiment and Stock Returns

Author

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  • Konstantinos Drakos

Abstract

Motivated by the investor sentiment literature and assuming that terrorist activity influences investor mood the paper explores whether terrorism exerts a significant negative impact on daily stock market returns for a sample of 22 countries. The employed empirical specifications are based on flexible versions of the World CAPM allowing for autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity. The results suggest that terrorist activity leads to significantly lower returns on the day of terrorist attack occurrence. In addition, the negative effect of terrorist activity is substantially amplified as the level of psychosocial effects increases. On the one hand this evidence sheds light to the underlying mechanism via which terrorism affects stock markets while on the other hand provides further empirical support for the sentiment effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Konstantinos Drakos, 2009. "Big Questions, Little Answers: Terrorism Activity, Investor Sentiment and Stock Returns," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 8, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diweos:diweos8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kollias, Christos & Papadamou, Stephanos & Stagiannis, Apostolos, 2011. "Terrorism and capital markets: The effects of the Madrid and London bomb attacks," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 532-541, October.
    2. Randall K. Filer & Dragana Stanišić, 2016. "The Effect of Terrorist Incidents on Capital Flows," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(2), pages 502-513, May.
    3. Gardeazabal, Javier, 2010. "Methods for Measuring Aggregate Costs of Conflict," DFAEII Working Papers 2010-09, University of the Basque Country - Department of Foundations of Economic Analysis II.
    4. Michael Brzoska & Raphael Bossong & Eric van Um, 2011. "Security Economics in the European Context: Implications of the EUSECON Project," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 58, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sentiment; Terrorism; Stock Market; Panel; Pooled Panel ARCH;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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