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The Effect of Terrorist Incidents on Capital Flows

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  • Randall Filer
  • Dragana Stanišic

Abstract

Current literature shows a significant negative impact of terrorism on countries economies. We explore this relationship in more detail. Using an unbalanced panel of over 160 countries for up to 25 years and the Global Terrorism Database (GTD) we show a decrease in FDI as a consequence of terrorism. We also find evidence that FDI flows are more sensitive to terrorism than either portfolio investments or external debt flows. Finally, we test the hypothesis that terrorism has negative spill-over effects on FDI flows into neighboring countries and find evidence that cultural but not geographical closeness matters.

Suggested Citation

  • Randall Filer & Dragana Stanišic, 2012. "The Effect of Terrorist Incidents on Capital Flows," CESifo Working Paper Series 3998, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3998
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles, Amelie & Darne, Olivier, 2006. "Large shocks and the September 11th terrorist attacks on international stock markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 683-698, July.
    2. Procasky, William J. & Ujah, Nacasius U., 2016. "Terrorism and its impact on the cost of debt," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 253-266.
    3. Blomberg, S. Brock & Hess, Gregory D. & Weerapana, Akila, 2004. "Economic conditions and terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 463-478, June.
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    5. Konstantinos Drakos, 2009. "Big Questions, Little Answers: Terrorism Activity, Investor Sentiment and Stock Returns," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 8, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Hanousek, Jan & Hajkova, Dana & Filer, Randall K., 2008. "A rise by any other name? Sensitivity of growth regressions to data source," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1188-1206, September.
    7. Chen, Andrew H. & Siems, Thomas F., 2004. "The effects of terrorism on global capital markets," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 349-366, June.
    8. Eckstein, Zvi & Tsiddon, Daniel, 2004. "Macroeconomic consequences of terror: theory and the case of Israel," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 971-1002, July.
    9. Abadie, Alberto & Gardeazabal, Javier, 2008. "Terrorism and the world economy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 1-27, January.
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    12. Sultan Mehmood, 2014. "Terrorism and the macroeconomy: Evidence from Pakistan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(5), pages 509-534, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Heri Bezić & Tomislav Galović & Petar Mišević, 2016. "The key goal of this research is to empirically determine the effects of terrorism on FDI of the selected EU and EEA member countries," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 34(2), pages 333-362.
    2. Metaxas, Theodore & Kechagia, Polyxeni, 2017. "FDI and Terrorism in developing Asia: Approaches and Discussion," MPRA Paper 78165, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    FDI; terrorism; lending; portfolio investment;

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General

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