IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/44y2012i31p4087-4099.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Testing equity market efficiency around terrorist attacks

Author

Listed:
  • Les Coleman

Abstract

This article uses the nine major bombings since 1998 that have been attributed to Al Qaida to examine market efficiency, including a test of rumours that investors traded with advance knowledge of attacks. Analysis of these related, but individually unexpected, events confirms markets are semi-strong efficient: it now takes well under a trading day to fully price in a completely unexpected attack. On balance, markets also proved strongly efficient with no conclusive evidence of insider trading.

Suggested Citation

  • Les Coleman, 2012. "Testing equity market efficiency around terrorist attacks," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(31), pages 4087-4099, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:44:y:2012:i:31:p:4087-4099
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2011.587778
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00036846.2011.587778
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1080/00036846.2011.587778?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dennis Mooney & Richard Zuber & John Gandar & Reinhold Lamb, 2006. "The reaction of stock returns to Department of Homeland Security threat level changes," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(5), pages 361-369.
    2. Ray C. Fair, 2002. "Events That Shook the Market," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75(4), pages 713-732, October.
    3. Alberto Abadie & Javier Gardeazabal, 2003. "The Economic Costs of Conflict: A Case Study of the Basque Country," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 113-132, March.
    4. Malatesta, Paul H. & Thompson, Rex, 1985. "Partially anticipated events: A model of stock price reactions with an application to corporate acquisitions," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 237-250, June.
    5. Alexander Mende, 2006. "09/11 on the USD/EUR foreign exchange market," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 213-222.
    6. Eldor, Rafi & Melnick, Rafi, 2004. "Financial markets and terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 367-386, June.
    7. Mete Feridun, 2011. "Impact of terrorism on tourism in Turkey: empirical evidence from Turkey," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(24), pages 3349-3354.
    8. Chen, Andrew H. & Siems, Thomas F., 2004. "The effects of terrorism on global capital markets," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 349-366, June.
    9. Alan Fox & Kwaku Opong, 1999. "The Impact of Board Changes on Shareholder Wealth: some UK evidence," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(4), pages 385-396, October.
    10. Dreher, Axel & Gassebner, Martin, 2008. "Does political proximity to the U.S. cause terror?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 27-29, April.
    11. Carter, David A. & Simkins, Betty J., 2004. "The market's reaction to unexpected, catastrophic events: the case of airline stock returns and the September 11th attacks," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 539-558, September.
    12. De Bondt, Werner F M & Thaler, Richard, 1985. "Does the Stock Market Overreact?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 40(3), pages 793-805, July.
    13. Les Coleman, 2011. "An Exploratory Analysis of Factors Influencing Initial Market Response and Media Reports following Shock Corporate Events," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 46(2), pages 313-336, May.
    14. Fama, Eugene F, 1970. "Efficient Capital Markets: A Review of Theory and Empirical Work," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 25(2), pages 383-417, May.
    15. Stephen A. Ross, 2003. "Forensic Finance: Enron and Others," 'Angelo Costa' Lectures Serie, SIPI Spa, issue Lect. IV.
    16. Allen M. Poteshman, 2006. "Unusual Option Market Activity and the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(4), pages 1703-1726, July.
    17. Aliza Fleischer & Steven Buccola, 2002. "War, terror, and the tourism market in Israel," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(11), pages 1335-1343.
    18. Charles, Amelie & Darne, Olivier, 2006. "Large shocks and the September 11th terrorist attacks on international stock markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 683-698, July.
    19. Seyhun, H. Nejat, 1986. "Insiders' profits, costs of trading, and market efficiency," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 189-212, June.
    20. Drakos, Konstantinos, 2004. "Terrorism-induced structural shifts in financial risk: airline stocks in the aftermath of the September 11th terror attacks," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 435-446, June.
    21. Taufiq Choudhry, 2005. "September 11 and time-varying beta of United States companies," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(17), pages 1227-1242.
    22. Brown, Stephen J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1985. "Using daily stock returns : The case of event studies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 3-31, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Faheem Aslam & Amir Rafique & Aneel Salman & Hyoung-Goo Kang & Wahbeeah Mohti, 2018. "The Impact Of Terrorism On Financial Markets: Evidence From Asia," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 63(05), pages 1183-1204, December.
    2. Klaudia Radoczy & Akos Toth-Pajor, 2021. "Investors' Reactions to Extreme Events in the Hungarian Stock Market," Financial and Economic Review, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary), vol. 20(3), pages 5-30.
    3. Hudson, Robert & Urquhart, Andrew, 2015. "War and stock markets: The effect of World War Two on the British stock market," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 166-177.
    4. Al-Shboul, Mohammad & Alsharari, Nizar, 2019. "The dynamic behavior of evolving efficiency: Evidence from the UAE stock markets," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 119-135.
    5. Piccoli, Pedro & Chaudhury, Mo & Souza, Alceu, 2017. "How do stocks react to extreme market events? Evidence from Brazil," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 275-284.
    6. Aslam Faheem & Awan Tahir Mumtaz & Mohmand Yasir Tariq & Kang Hyoung-Goo & Mughal Khurrum Shahzad, 2021. "Stock Market Volatility and Terrorism: New Evidence from the Markov Switching Model," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 27(2), pages 263-284, May.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Gok, Ibrahim Yasar & Demirdogen, Yavuz & Topuz, Sefa, 2020. "The impacts of terrorism on Turkish equity market: An investigation using intraday data," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 540(C).
    2. Bruno S. Frey & Simon Luechinger & Alois Stutzer, 2007. "Calculating Tragedy: Assessing The Costs Of Terrorism," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 1-24, February.
    3. Friedrich Schneider & Tilman Brück & Daniel Meierrieks, 2010. "The Economics of Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism: A Survey (Part II)," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1050, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. J. W.B. Bos & M. Frömmel & M. Lamers, 2013. "FDI, Terrorism and the Availability Heuristic for U.S. Investors before and after 9/11," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 13/850, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    5. Thai-Ha Le & Donghyun Park & Cong-Phu-Khanh Tran & Binh Tran-Nam, 2018. "The Impact of the Hai Yang Shi You 981 Event on Vietnam’s Stock Markets," Journal of Emerging Market Finance, Institute for Financial Management and Research, vol. 17(3_suppl), pages 344-375, December.
    6. Kallberg, Jarl & Liu, Crocker H. & Pasquariello, Paolo, 2008. "Updating expectations: An analysis of post-9/11 returns," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 400-432, November.
    7. Shashitha Gimhani Jayakody, 2017. "The Impact of the Sri Lankan Civil War on the Stock Market Performances," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 394-402.
    8. Konstantinos Drakos, 2011. "Security Economics: A Guide For Data Availability And Needs," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 147-159.
    9. Konstantinos Drakos, 2010. "Terrorism activity, investor sentiment, and stock returns," Review of Financial Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 19(3), pages 128-135, August.
    10. Anastasios Zopiatis & Christos S. Savva & Neophytos Lambertides & Michael McAleer, 2016. "Tourism stocks in times of crises: An econometric investigation of non-macro factors," Documentos de Trabajo del ICAE 2016-18, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Instituto Complutense de Análisis Económico.
    11. Gan Jin & Md Rafiul Karim & Günther G. Schulze, 2024. "The Stock Market Effects of Islamist versus Non-Islamist Terror," Discussion Paper Series 45 JEL Classification: D7, Department of International Economic Policy, University of Freiburg, revised Feb 2024.
    12. Anastasios Zopiatis & Christos S. Savva & Neophytos Lambertides & Michael McAleer, 2017. "Tourism Stocks in Times of Crises: An Econometric Investigation of Unexpected Non-macroeconomic Factors," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-052/III, Tinbergen Institute.
    13. Corbet, Shaen & Gurdgiev, Constantin & Meegan, Andrew, 2018. "Long-term stock market volatility and the influence of terrorist attacks in Europe," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 118-131.
    14. Najam, Najam Ul Sabeeh & Mehmood, Arshad Mehmood, 2019. "The economic cost of terrorism and natural disasters: A deeper analysis of the financial market markets of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 92278, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Kollias, Christos & Manou, Efthalia & Papadamou, Stephanos & Stagiannis, Apostolos, 2011. "Stock markets and terrorist attacks: Comparative evidence from a large and a small capitalization market," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(S1), pages 64-77.
    16. Al-Ississ Mohamad, 2015. "The Cross-Border Impact of Political Violence," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 21(2), pages 239-272, April.
    17. Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr, 2016. "Is there a link between politics and stock returns? A literature survey," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 15-23.
    18. Iatridis, George, 2012. "Terrorist attacks and company financial numbers: Evidence on earnings management and value relevance from Madrid, London and Istanbul," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 204-220.
    19. Dirk Brounen & Jeroen Derwall, 2010. "The Impact of Terrorist Attacks on International Stock Markets," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 16(4), pages 585-598, September.
    20. Mnasri, Ayman & Nechi, Salem, 2016. "Impact of terrorist attacks on stock market volatility in emerging markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 184-202.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:44:y:2012:i:31:p:4087-4099. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Chris Longhurst (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.