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Which is the More Predictable Gender? Public Good Contribution and Personality

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  • M Perugini
  • J H W Tan
  • D J Zizzo

Abstract

Questionnaires can and have been used to predict behaviour in economic settings. Using two sets of measures from personality psychology (the Big Six) and social psychology (Social Value Orientation), we find that the behaviour of men is predictable in the first half of a public good contribution experiment, whereas that of women is not. This result agrees with the reinterpretation of Carol Gilligan?s (1982) view that women are more sensitive to the context in which decisions are made. In practice, questionnaires such as those used in human resource management settings may fail to capture women?s preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • M Perugini & J H W Tan & D J Zizzo, 2010. "Which is the More Predictable Gender? Public Good Contribution and Personality," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 15(1), pages 83-110, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eis:articl:110perugini
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    Cited by:

    1. Zizzo, Daniel John & Fleming, Piers, 2011. "Can experimental measures of sensitivity to social pressure predict public good contribution?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(3), pages 239-242, June.
    2. Okhrin, Irena & Richter, Knut, 2010. "The linear dynamic lot size problem with minimum order quantities," Discussion Papers 283, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Department of Business Administration and Economics.
    3. Okhrin, Irena & Richter, Knut, 2011. "An O(T3) algorithm for the capacitated lot sizing problem with minimum order quantities," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 211(3), pages 507-514, June.
    4. Paolo Crosetto & Antonio Filippin, 2016. "A theoretical and experimental appraisal of four risk elicitation methods," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(3), pages 613-641, September.
    5. Etilé, Fabrice & Teyssier, Sabrina, 2013. "Corporate social responsibility and the economics of consumer social responsibility," Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, Editions NecPlus, vol. 94(02), pages 221-259, June.
    6. Daniel John Zizzo & Piers Fleming, 2009. "Social desirability, approval and public good contribution," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 09-11, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    7. Paolo Crosetto & Antonio Filippin, 2013. "A Theoretical and Experimental Appraisal of Five Risk Elicitation Methods," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 547, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    8. Volk, Stefan & Thöni, Christian & Ruigrok, Winfried, 2012. "Temporal stability and psychological foundations of cooperation preferences," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 664-676.
    9. Kanagaretnam, Kiridaran & Mestelman, Stuart & Nainar, Khalid & Shehata, Mohamed, 2009. "The impact of social value orientation and risk attitudes on trust and reciprocity," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 368-380, June.
    10. Bryan C. McCannon & John B. Stevens, 2015. "Role of Personality Style on Bargaining Outcomes," Working Papers 15-22, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    11. Chuah, Swee-Hoon & Hoffmann, Robert & Larner, Jeremy, 2014. "Chinese values and negotiation behaviour: A bargaining experiment," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1203-1211.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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