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Estimating the effects of procrastination on performance: A small sample study


  • Onji, Kazuki


Previous studies have found student procrastination to compromise learning outcomes using initial test scores to control for the influence of unobserved ability. The validity of such analysis rests on the assumption that students do not react to initial test scores. Utilizing daily information on student behavior, this paper shows that feedback effects were negligible in a student sample from a university second-language course. The paper then objectively quantifies the degree of procrastination, and finds evidence for detrimental effects of procrastination on test scores, corroborating previous studies. The result lends confidence to the value-added specification of the education production function.

Suggested Citation

  • Onji, Kazuki, 2013. "Estimating the effects of procrastination on performance: A small sample study," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 85-90.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:44:y:2013:i:c:p:85-90 DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2013.02.009

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Azmat, Ghazala & Iriberri, Nagore, 2010. "The importance of relative performance feedback information: Evidence from a natural experiment using high school students," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(7-8), pages 435-452, August.
    2. Gregory A. Krohn & Catherine M. O'Connor, 2005. "Student Effort and Performance over the Semester," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 3-28, January.
    3. Wong, Wei-Kang, 2008. "How much time-inconsistency is there and does it matter? Evidence on self-awareness, size, and effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(3-4), pages 645-656, December.
    4. Cass R. Sunstein & Richard H. Thaler, 2003. "Libertarian paternalism is not an oxymoron," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 48(Jun).
    5. Richard H. Thaler & Cass R. Sunstein, 2003. "Libertarian Paternalism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 175-179, May.
    6. Colleen Donovan & David N. Figlio & Mark Rush, 2006. "Cramming: The Effects of School Accountability on College-Bound Students," NBER Working Papers 12628, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 3-33, February.
    8. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
    9. Judson, Ruth A. & Owen, Ann L., 1999. "Estimating dynamic panel data models: a guide for macroeconomists," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 9-15, October.
    10. De Paola, Maria & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2011. "Frequency of examinations and student achievement in a randomized experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1416-1429.
    11. Dolton, Peter & Marcenaro, Oscar D. & Navarro, Lucia, 2003. "The effective use of student time: a stochastic frontier production function case study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 547-560, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. HIGUCHI Yuki & SASAKI Miyuki & NAKAMURO Makiko, 2017. "Impacts of an ICT-assisted Program on Attitudes and English Communicative Abilities: An experiment in a Japanese high school," Discussion papers 17030, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

    More about this item


    Education production function; Self-control problems; Test performance;

    JEL classification:

    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General


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