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Procrastination, prompts, and preferences: Evidence from daily records of self-directed learning activities

  • Onji, Kazuki
  • Kikuchi, Rina

This paper presents evidence showing that a libertarian paternalistic intervention having significant but uneven effects on the student procrastination of a coursework assignment. We observe the degree of procrastination in a language course at a Japanese university with individuals’ electronic records of daily activities. With a quasi-experiment that generates variations in the frequency of interventions and the preference of students towards the course, we examine the effects of in-class verbal prompts by an instructor on the timing of task completion. We find that prompts affect behavior, especially when reinforced, but the responsiveness depends on the class preferences and the timing of interventions.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 929-941

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Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:40:y:2011:i:6:p:929-941
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

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