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Positive collaboration: Factors and mechanisms of evolution

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Abstract

This article proposes that two types of collaboration can be distinguished: a positive collaboration (not directed against third parties) and negative collaboration. I consider the hypothesis that in the process of social development, the transaction costs ratio of the three main types of coordination — competition, power, and collaboration — is changing in favor of the latter. The article examines the mechanisms that are responsible for the implementation of this tendency and attempts to explain its nonmonotonicity. It is shown that the strengthening role of positive collaboration is largely explained by cultural changes, including the enhancement of tolerance culture, spread of cosmopolitanism and altruism, and increase in the planning horizon as well as trust radius. I demonstrate the importance of the institutions that support positive collaboration in the process of catching-up development; it is shown that shock reforms could lead to the formation of negative collaboration mechanisms. A program of interdisciplinary research is outlined for the further development of these ideas.

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  • Polterovich, Victor, 2017. "Positive collaboration: Factors and mechanisms of evolution," Russian Journal of Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 24-41.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rujoec:v:3:y:2017:i:1:p:24-41
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ruje.2017.02.002
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405473917300028
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    1. Metcalfe, John S. & Ramlogan, Ronnie & Uyarra, E., 2002. "Economic Development and the Competitive Process," Centre on Regulation and Competition (CRC) Working papers 30612, University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM).
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    Keywords

    B00; B4; B52; N00; P11; coordination; positive and negative collaboration; golden rule of morality; transaction costs; tolerance; cosmopolitanism; altruism; radius of trust; catching-up development;

    JEL classification:

    • B00 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General - - - History of Economic Thought, Methodology, and Heterodox Approaches
    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • N00 - Economic History - - General - - - General
    • P11 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform

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