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When evidence is not enough: Findings from a randomized evaluation of Evidence-Based Literacy Instruction (EBLI)

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  • Jacob, Brian

Abstract

This paper reports the results of an experimental evaluation of Evidence-Based Literacy Instruction (EBLI). Developed over 15 years ago, EBLI aims to provide teachers with instructional strategies to improve reading accuracy, fluency and comprehension. Sixty-three teachers in grades 2–5 in seven Michigan charter schools were randomly assigned within school-grade blocks to receive EBLI training or a business-as-usual control condition. Comparing students in treatment and control classrooms during the 2014–15 school year, we find no significant impact on reading performance. Teacher survey responses and interviews with program staff suggest that several implementation challenges may have played a role in the null findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacob, Brian, 2017. "When evidence is not enough: Findings from a randomized evaluation of Evidence-Based Literacy Instruction (EBLI)," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 5-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:45:y:2017:i:c:p:5-16
    DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2016.09.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Machin, Stephen & McNally, Sandra, 2008. "The literacy hour," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1441-1462, June.
    2. Bouguen, Adrien, 2016. "Adjusting content to individual student needs: Further evidence from an in-service teacher training program," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 90-112.
    3. Adrien Bouguen, 2016. "Adjusting content to individual student needs: Further evidence from an in-service teacher training program," PSE-Ecole d'économie de Paris (Postprint) halshs-01510383, HAL.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally & Martina Viarengo, 2018. "Changing How Literacy Is Taught: Evidence on Synthetic Phonics," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 217-241, May.
    2. Adrien Bouguen & Julien Grenet & Marc Gurgand, 2017. "Does class size influence student achievement?," Post-Print halshs-02522747, HAL.
    3. Adrien Bouguen & Julien Grenet & Marc Gurgand, 2017. "Does class size influence student achievement?," Post-Print halshs-02522747, HAL.
    4. Hong, Youngjin Stephanie & Henly, Julia R., 2020. "Supplemental nutrition assistance program and school readiness skills," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).
    5. Adrien Bouguen & Julien Grenet & Marc Gurgand, 2017. "La taille des classes influence-t-elle la réussite scolaire ?," Institut des Politiques Publiques hal-02453596, HAL.
    6. Adrien Bouguen & Julien Grenet & Marc Gurgand, 2017. "La taille des classes influence-t-elle la réussite scolaire ?," Post-Print hal-02453596, HAL.

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