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Commodity futures and market efficiency: A fractional integrated approach

  • Fernandez, Viviana

In financial time series, persistence or inertia is a feature usually observable in absolute returns, i.e., a proxy for volatility. Moreover, asset return series should be essentially unpredictable according to the efficiency market hypothesis (EMH) in its weak form. Surprisingly, recent literature has found evidence of anti-persistence in technology stocks and commodity futures returns. Anti-persistence would be indicative of an overreaction of asset prices to incoming information. In this article, we concentrate on a sample of 20 DJ-AIG commodity future indices--including broad indices and sub-indices (e.g., energy, grains, industrial metals, and livestock) over the period January 1991-June 2008. We conclude that returns series either over-react or under-react to new market information, which disconfirms the EMH in its weak form. Such disconfirmation would make it possible for market participants to devise non-linear statistical models for improved index forecasting and derivatives valuation.

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Volume (Year): 35 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 276-282

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jrpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:4:p:276-282
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