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How foreclosure delays impact mortgage defaults and mortgage modifications

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  • Kim, Jiseob

Abstract

The mortgage foreclosure process was prolonged after the financial crisis. I analyze its impact on mortgage defaults and post-foreclosure modifications. When a household fails to repay a mortgage, the delinquent household can stay in its home without paying rent or making a mortgage payment until the foreclosure process terminates, leading to an increase in defaults. My quantitative exercise shows that unexpected declines in house prices with foreclosure delays that mirror the financial crisis triple the mortgage delinquency rate, while it temporarily reducing the foreclosure rate by half. An increase in mortgage defaults motivates financial intermediaries to voluntarily modify loan terms after initiating the foreclosure process to mitigate their losses.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Jiseob, 2019. "How foreclosure delays impact mortgage defaults and mortgage modifications," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 18-37.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:59:y:2019:i:c:p:18-37
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmacro.2018.10.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreclosure delay; Mortgage default; Delinquency; Mortgage modification;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand

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