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Does Government Intervention Affect Banking Globalization?


  • Kleymenova, Anya
  • Rose, Andrew K.
  • Wieladek, Tomasz


Using data from British and American banks, we provide empirical evidence that government intervention affects the global activities of individual banks along three dimensions: depth, breadth and persistence. We examine depth by studying whether a bank's preference for domestic, as opposed to external, lending (funding) changes when it is subjected to a large public intervention, such as bank nationalization. Our results suggest that, following nationalization, non-British banks allocate their lending away from the UK and increase their external funding. Second, we find that nationalized banks from the same country tend to have portfolios of foreign assets that are spread across countries in a way that is far more similar than those of either private bank from the same country or nationalized banks from different countries, consistent with an impact on the breadth of globalization. Third, we study the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) to examine the persistence of the effect of large government interventions. We find weak evidence that upon entry into the TARP, foreign lending declines but domestic does not. This effect is observable at the aggregate level, and seems to disappear upon TARP exit. Collectively, this evidence suggests that large government interventions affect the depth and breadth of banking globalization, but may not persist after public interventions are unwound.

Suggested Citation

  • Kleymenova, Anya & Rose, Andrew K. & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2016. "Does Government Intervention Affect Banking Globalization?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 43-58.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jjieco:v:40:y:2016:i:c:p:43-58 DOI: 10.1016/j.jjie.2016.03.002

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shin-ichi Fukuda & Mariko Tanaka, 2016. "Monetary Policy and Covered Interest Parity in the Post GFC Period: Evidence from Australian Dollar and the NZ Dollar," CARF F-Series CARF-F-401, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
    2. repec:eee:jimfin:v:74:y:2017:i:c:p:301-317 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Shin-ichi Fukuda & Mariko Tanaka, 2016. "Monetary Policy and Covered Interest Parity in the Post GFC Period: Evidence from the Australian Dollar and the NZ Dollar," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1032, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

    More about this item


    Bank; Empirical; Nationalization; Data; panel; Effect; Domestic; Foreign; Liability; TARP;

    JEL classification:

    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation


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