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Micro-marketing healthier choices: Effects of personalized ordering suggestions on restaurant purchases

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  • Bedard, Kelly
  • Kuhn, Peter

Abstract

We study the effects of the Nutricate receipt, which makes personalized recommendations to switch from unhealthy to healthier items at a restaurant chain. We find that the receipts shifted the mix of items purchased toward the healthier alternatives. For example, the share of adult main dishes requesting “no sauce” increased by 6.8 percent, the share of kids’ meals with apples (instead of fries) rose by 7.0 percent and the share of breakfast sandwiches without sausage increased by 3.8 percent. The results illustrate the potential of emerging information technologies, which allow retailers to tailor product marketing to individual consumers, to generate healthier choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Bedard, Kelly & Kuhn, Peter, 2015. "Micro-marketing healthier choices: Effects of personalized ordering suggestions on restaurant purchases," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 106-122.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:39:y:2015:i:c:p:106-122
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2014.10.006
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Lechner & Nuria Rodriguez-Planas & Daniel Fernández Kranz, 2016. "Difference-in-difference estimation by FE and OLS when there is panel non-response," Journal of Applied Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(11), pages 2044-2052, August.
    2. Stearns, Jenna, 2015. "The effects of paid maternity leave: Evidence from Temporary Disability Insurance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 85-102.

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    Keywords

    Restaurant; Fast food; Marketing; Obesity; Calories; Fat;

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