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First of the month effect: Does it apply across food retail channels?

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  • Damon, Amy L.
  • King, Robert P.
  • Leibtag, Ephraim

Abstract

In this study we use detailed daily scanner data on household food purchases to examine monthly food expenditure patterns across food retail channels. We compare food expenditure patterns in high and low-income households comparing those where Supplementary Nutrition Assistance (SNAP) is received in the first 10days of the month versus households which receive SNAP over the first 15days of the month. We find that food expenditure patterns vary systematically across the month within different retail channels by income and SNAP payment schedules. Low-income households in early SNAP distribution areas decrease their grocery and mass/club/superstore expenditures at the end of the calendar month and supplement this decrease with increased food expenditures in convenience stores and food away from home. Households in staggered SNAP payment areas show far fewer systematic patterns given the more distributed payment system.

Suggested Citation

  • Damon, Amy L. & King, Robert P. & Leibtag, Ephraim, 2013. "First of the month effect: Does it apply across food retail channels?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 18-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:41:y:2013:i:c:p:18-27 DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2013.04.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fiedler, John L. & Mwangi, Dena M., 2016. "Improving household consumption and expenditure surveys’ food consumption metrics: Developing a strategic approach to the unfinished agenda:," IFPRI discussion papers 1570, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Baylis, Katherine R. & Fan, Linlin & Gundersen, Craig & Michele, Ver Ploeg & James, Ziliak, 2014. "The Location and Timing of SNAP Purchases," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170200, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Chad Cotti & John Gordanier & Orgul Ozturk, 2016. "Eat (and Drink) Better Tonight: Food Stamp Benefit Timing and Drunk Driving Fatalities," American Journal of Health Economics, MIT Press, vol. 2(4), pages 511-534, Fall.
    4. Zaffou, Madiha & Campbell, Benjamin & Rabinowitz, Adam, 2016. "Spillover Effect of Participation in Women, Infant and Children (WIC) Program on Consumer’s Purchasing Behavior of Private Label Goods," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230100, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    5. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:72:y:2017:i:c:p:132-145 is not listed on IDEAS

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