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Traditional food traders in developing countries and competition from supermarkets: Evidence from Indonesia

  • Suryadarma, Daniel
  • Poesoro, Adri
  • Akhmadi
  • Budiyati, Sri
  • Rosfadhila, Meuthia
  • Suryahadi, Asep

Indonesia's urban centers recently underwent an explosion of supermarkets. With cheaper, higher quality commodities and better services, supermarkets have the potential to drive traders in traditional markets out of business. In this paper, we evaluate whether this is indeed the case. We find that traditional traders experienced declines in their business. However, both qualitative and quantitative findings indicate that the main cause of decline is not supermarkets. Instead, traditional markets are plagued with internal problems and face increasingly bitter competition from street vendors. Therefore, the policy recommendations include strengthening traditional traders and seriously tackling the problem of street vendors.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

Volume (Year): 35 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 79-86

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:1:p:79-86
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

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  1. Jerry Hausman & Ephraim Leibtag, 2007. "Consumer benefits from increased competition in shopping outlets: Measuring the effect of Wal-Mart," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(7), pages 1157-1177.
  2. Georgeanne M. Artz & Kenneth E. Stone, 2006. "Analyzing the Impact of Wal-Mart Supercenters on Local Food Store Sales," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1296-1303.
  3. Bart Minten, 2008. "The Food Retail Revolution in Poor Countries: Is It Coming or Is It Over?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 767-789.
  4. Emek Basker, 2005. "Job Creation or Destruction? Labor Market Effects of Wal-Mart Expansion," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 174-183, February.
  5. Elizabeth M.M.Q. Farina & Rubens Nunes & Guilherme F. de A Monteiro, 2005. "Supermarkets and their impacts on the agrifood system of Brazil: The competition among retailers," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(2), pages 133-147.
  6. W. Bruce Traill, 2006. "The Rapid Rise of Supermarkets?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(2), pages 163-174, 03.
  7. D'Haese, Marijke & Van Huylenbroeck, Guido, 2005. "The rise of supermarkets and changing expenditure patterns of poor rural households case study in the Transkei area, South Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 97-113, February.
  8. Thomas Reardon & C. Peter Timmer & Christopher B. Barrett & Julio Berdegué, 2003. "The Rise of Supermarkets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1140-1146.
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