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Consumer acceptance of provitamin A-biofortified maize in Maputo, Mozambique

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  • Stevens, Robyn
  • Winter-Nelson, Alex

Abstract

Biofortified staple foods hold the potential to alleviate micronutrient malnutrition in many impoverished regions of the world. However, biofortification often alters the flavor, appearance, and other features of foods in ways that may limit consumer acceptance of the new varieties and diminish their impact. This research examined the acceptance of provitamin A-biofortified maize through taste tests and a trading experiment conducted in Maputo, Mozambique. On average, participants ranked the taste, texture, and appearance of their local white maize over an orange, biofortified variety and over a white variety with similar texture and flavor as the biofortified maize. Nonetheless, a large share of participants in a framed experiment accepted offers to trade local white maize meal for meal from the biofortified maize. Household size, the presence of small children, dietary diversity, and perceived taste were statistically significant determinants of acceptance. Results suggest that existing preferences for white maize do not preclude acceptance of orange, biofortified varieties and that provitamin A-biofortified maize may be a self-targeting nutritional intervention.

Suggested Citation

  • Stevens, Robyn & Winter-Nelson, Alex, 2008. "Consumer acceptance of provitamin A-biofortified maize in Maputo, Mozambique," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 341-351, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:33:y:2008:i:4:p:341-351
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    Cited by:

    1. Murekezi, Abdoul & Oparinde, Adewale & Birol, Ekin, 2017. "Consumer market segments for biofortified iron beans in Rwanda: Evidence from a hedonic testing study," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 35-49.
    2. Waldman, Kurt B. & Kerr, John M. & Isaacs, Krista B., 2014. "Combining participatory crop trials and experimental auctions to estimate farmer preferences for improved common bean in Rwanda," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 183-192.
    3. Mohammed H. Alemu & Søren Bøye Olsen & Suzanne E. Vedel & John Kinyuru & Kennedy O. Pambo, 2016. "Integrating sensory evaluations in incentivized discrete choice experiments to assess consumer demand for cricket flour buns in Kenya," IFRO Working Paper 2016/02, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    4. Etumnu, Chinonso, 2016. "Behavioral Determinants of Biofortified Food Acceptance: The Case of Orange-fleshed Sweet Potato in Ghana," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235249, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Hans D. Steur & Jeroen Buysse & Shuyi Feng & Xavier Gellynck, 2013. "Role of Information on Consumers’ Willingness-to-pay for Genetically-modified Rice with Health Benefits: An Application to China," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 27(4), pages 391-408, December.
    6. Anneleen Vandeplas & Bart Minten, 2015. "Food quality in domestic markets of developing economies: a comparative study of two countries," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(5), pages 617-628, September.
    7. Meenakshi, J. V. & Banerji, A. & Manyong, Victor & Tomlins, Keith & Hamukwala, Priscilla & Zulu, Rodah & Mungoma, Catherine, 2010. "Consumer acceptance of provitamin A orange maize in rural Zambia:," HarvestPlus Working Papers 4, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0676-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Mohammed H. Alemu & Søren B. Olsen & Suzanne E. Vedel & Kennedy O. Pambo & Victor O. Owino, 2015. "Consumer acceptance and willingness to pay for edible insects as food in Kenya: the case of white winged termites," IFRO Working Paper 2015/10, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    10. Mohammed H. Alemu & Søren B. Olsen, 2017. "Can a Repeated Opt-Out Reminder remove hypothetical bias in discrete choice experiments? An application to consumer valuation of novel food products," IFRO Working Paper 2017/05, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    11. Meenakshi, J.V. & Banerji, A. & Manyong, Victor & Tomlins, Keith & Mittal, Nitya & Hamukwala, Priscilla, 2012. "Using a discrete choice experiment to elicit the demand for a nutritious food: Willingness-to-pay for orange maize in rural Zambia," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 62-71.
    12. Banerji, Abhijit & Birol, Ekin & Karandikar, Bhushana & Rampal, Jeevant, 2016. "Information, branding, certification, and consumer willingness to pay for high-iron pearl millet: Evidence from experimental auctions in Maharashtra, India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 133-141.

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