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Benefit cost analysis of an import access request

Listed author(s):
  • Cook, David C.
Registered author(s):

    Invasive species outbreaks are often unintended side effects of trade. In this paper partial equilibrium trade models and stochastic bioeconomic impact simulation models are combined to present a benefit cost analysis template to assess market access requests. The template is used to assess the likely regional economic welfare implications of a decision by Australian biosecurity regulators to allow the Chilean table grape industry access to the national table grape market. We show that consumption benefits expected to accrue to Western Australia are exceeded by increases in likely invasive species damage resulting from grape imports, implying that insufficient consumer gains are grounds to deny market access.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306-9192(07)00053-X
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

    Volume (Year): 33 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 3 (June)
    Pages: 277-285

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:33:y:2008:i:3:p:277-285
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

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    1. James, Sallie & Anderson, Kym, 1998. "On the need for more economic assessment of quarantine/SPS policies," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 42(4), December.
    2. Zhao, Xueyan & Anderson, Kym & Wittwer, Glyn, 2003. "Who gains from Australian generic wine promotion and R&D?," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(2), June.
    3. Peterson, Everett B. & Orden, David, 2006. "Linking Risk and Economic Assessments in the Analysis of Plant Pest Regulations: The Case of U.S. Imports of Mexican Avocados," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21339, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Pimentel, David & Zuniga, Rodolfo & Morrison, Doug, 2005. "Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United States," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 273-288, February.
    5. Timothy E. Josling & Donna Roberts & David Orden, 2004. "Food Regulation and Trade: Toward a Safe and Open Global System," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 347, November.
    6. Vald├ęs, Alberto & Zietz, Joachim A., 1980. "Agricultural protection in OECD countries: its cost to less-developed countries," Research reports 21, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Cook, D. C. & Fraser, R. W., 2002. "Exploring the regional implications of interstate quarantine policies in Western Australia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 143-157, April.
    8. Cook, David C., 2005. "The 'Paradox of Thrips': Identifying a Critical Level of Investment in Pest Exclusion Activities in Western Australia," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 13.
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