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Skill accumulation in the market and at home

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  • Flemming, Jean

Abstract

An evolving outside option is introduced into a stochastic directed search model with skill loss during non-employment. Using multi-spell data from the SIPP, I show that average reemployment wages are only mildly sensitive to unemployment duration while the job finding probability is highly sensitive to duration, with evidence of true duration dependence in both variables. Though untargeted, the model produces a quantitatively accurate decline in the job finding probability and starting wage, improving over a model with a fixed outside option. The addition of aggregate shocks leads to an nonlinear response of the unemployment and participation rates during and after recessions, with more severe recessions resulting in stronger hysteresis.

Suggested Citation

  • Flemming, Jean, 2020. "Skill accumulation in the market and at home," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 189(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:189:y:2020:i:c:s0022053120300922
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jet.2020.105099
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Per Krusell & Toshihiko Mukoyama & Richard Rogerson & Ayşegül Şahin, 2017. "Gross Worker Flows over the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(11), pages 3447-3476, November.
    2. Jake Bradley & Lukas Mann, 2023. "Learning about labour markets," Discussion Papers 2023/01, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    3. Shisham Adhikari & Athanasios Geromichalos & Ioannis Kospentaris, 2023. "How much work experience do you need to get your first job? The macroeconomic implications of bias against labor market entrants," Working Papers 357, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Non-employment; Job search; Human capital; Home production;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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