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Aggregate risk and efficiency of mutual funds

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  • Kučinskas, Simas

Abstract

This paper studies the welfare properties of mutual funds in a Diamond–Dybvig economy with two sources of aggregate risk: (i) shocks to long-term investment returns; and (ii) shocks to aggregate liquidity demand. Mutual funds are inefficient when the long-term investment is risky. Mutual funds improve upon autarky by introducing a wedge between the market and technological rates of return. However, the wedge distorts the decisions of consumers not facing liquidity shocks, and the resulting equilibrium is inefficient. If only aggregate liquidity demand is subject to shocks, mutual funds can implement the social optimum (even when liquidity demand is not directly observable) by means of a price-contingent dividend policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Kučinskas, Simas, 2019. "Aggregate risk and efficiency of mutual funds," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 1-11.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:101:y:2019:i:c:p:1-11
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbankfin.2019.01.001
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