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The deterrence of crime through private security efforts: Theory and evidence

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  • Zimmerman, Paul R.

Abstract

Private individuals and entities invest in a wide variety of market-provisioned self-protection devices or services to mitigate their probability of victimization to crime. However, evaluating the effect of such private security measures remains understudied in the economics of crime literature. Unlike most previous studies, the present analysis considers four separate measures of private security: security guards, detectives and investigators, security system installers, and locksmiths. The effects of laws allowing the concealed carrying of weapons are also evaluated. As private security efforts are potentially endogenous to crime rates, dynamic GMM panel data models are estimated in addition to structural (non-instrumented) regressions. The empirical results suggest that the impact of private security efforts generally varies across crime types, though there appears to be a robust negative relationship between the employment of security system installers and the rate of property offenses.

Suggested Citation

  • Zimmerman, Paul R., 2014. "The deterrence of crime through private security efforts: Theory and evidence," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 66-75.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:irlaec:v:37:y:2014:i:c:p:66-75
    DOI: 10.1016/j.irle.2013.06.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Meehan, Brian, 2015. "The impact of licensing requirements on industrial organization and labor: Evidence from the U.S. private security market," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 113-121.
    2. Brian Meehan & Bruce Benson, 2015. "The occupations of regulators influence occupational regulation: evidence from the US private security industry," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(1), pages 97-117, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Crime; Deterrence; Market model; Private Security; Self-protection;

    JEL classification:

    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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