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U.S. monetary policy in disarray

  • Tatom, John A.

Monetary policy became more difficult to characterize during and after the mortgage foreclose and financial crises because of a shift to a new credit policy focused on private sector credit and that relies on traditional commercial banking strategies. The new credit policy broke the tight link that had existed between Fed credit and its effective monetary base, the monetary base that affects monetary aggregates. The Fed has adopted an exit strategy, but the discretionary powers that it followed remain in place as does a mistaken policy on the payment of interest on excess reserves.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Financial Stability.

Volume (Year): 12 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 47-58

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Handle: RePEc:eee:finsta:v:12:y:2014:i:c:p:47-58
DOI: 10.1016/j.jfs.2013.05.004
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jfstabil

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