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Reserves, Liquidity and Money: An Assessment of Balance sheet Policies

  • Jagjit S. Chadha

    ()

  • Luisa Corrado

    ()

  • Jack Meaning

    ()

The financial crisis and its aftermath has stimulated a vigorous debate on the use of macro-prudential instruments for both regulating the banking system and for providing additional tools for monetary policy makers. The widespread adoption of non-conventional monetary policies has provided some evidence on the efficacy of liquidity and asset purchases for offsetting the lower zero bound. Central banks have thus been reminded as to the effectiveness of extended open market operations as a supplementary tool of monetary policy. These tools are essentially fiscal instruments, as they issue central bank liabilities backed by fiscal transfers. And so having written these tools into the fiscal budget constraint, we can examine the consequences of these operations within the context of a micro-founded macroeconomic model of banking and money. We can mimic the responses of the Federal Reserve balance sheet to the crisis. Specifically, we examine the role of reserves for bond and capital swaps in stabilising the economy and also the impact of changing the composition of the central bank balance sheet. We find that such policies can significantly enhance the ability of the central bank to stabilise the economy. This is because balance sheet operations supply (remove) liquidity to a financial market that is otherwise short (long) of liquidity and hence allows other .nancial spreads to move less violently over the cycle to compensate.

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File URL: ftp://ftp.ukc.ac.uk/pub/ejr/RePEc/ukc/ukcedp/1208.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Kent in its series Studies in Economics with number 1208.

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Date of creation: Apr 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ukc:ukcedp:1208
Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Economics, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NP
Phone: +44 (0)1227 827497
Web page: http://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/

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  1. Vasco Curdia & Michael Woodford, 2010. "The Central Bank Balance Sheet as an Instrument of Monetary Policy," Discussion Papers 0910-16, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  2. Chadha, Jagjit S. & Corrado, Luisa, 2012. "Macro-prudential policy on liquidity: What does a DSGE model tell us?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 37-62.
  3. Scott Freeman & Joseph H. Haslag, 1993. "On the optimality of interest-bearing reserves in economies of overlapping generations," Research Paper 9328, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  4. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear Of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408, May.
  5. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo, 2000. "When Capital Inflows Come to a Sudden Stop: Consequences and Policy Options," MPRA Paper 6982, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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