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Macro-prudential policy on liquidity: What does a DSGE model tell us?

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  • Chadha, Jagjit S.
  • Corrado, Luisa

Abstract

The financial crisis has led to the development of an active debate on the use of macro-prudential instruments for regulating the banking system, in particular for liquidity and capital holdings. Within the context of a micro-founded macroeconomic model, we allow commercial banks to choose their optimal mix of assets, apportioning these either to reserves or private sector loans. We examine the implications for quantities, relative non-financial and financial prices from standard macroeconomic shocks alongside shocks to the expected liquidity of banks and to the efficiency of the banking sector. We focus on the response by the monetary sector, in particular the optimal reserve–deposit ratio adopted by commercial banks over the business cycle. Overall we find some rationale for Basel III in providing commercial banks with an incentive to hold a greater stock of liquid assets, such as reserves, but also to provide incentives to increase the cyclical variation in reserves holdings as this acts to limit excessive procyclicality of lending to the private sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Chadha, Jagjit S. & Corrado, Luisa, 2012. "Macro-prudential policy on liquidity: What does a DSGE model tell us?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 37-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jebusi:v:64:y:2012:i:1:p:37-62
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jeconbus.2011.04.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
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    3. Goodfriend, Marvin & McCallum, Bennett T., 2007. "Banking and interest rates in monetary policy analysis: A quantitative exploration," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(5), pages 1480-1507, July.
    4. Marvin Goodfriend, 2002. "Interest on reserves and monetary policy," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue May, pages 77-84.
    5. Sargent, Thomas & Wallace, Neil, 1985. "Interest on reserves," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 279-290, May.
    6. Hall Robert, 2002. "Controlling the Price Level," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-21, July.
    7. Bruce D. Smith, 1991. "Interest on Reserves and Sunspot Equilibria: Friedman's Proposal Reconsidered," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(1), pages 93-105.
    8. Freeman, Scott & Haslag, Joseph H, 1996. "On the Optimality of Interest-Bearing Reserves in Economies of Overlapping Generations," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 7(3), pages 557-565, April.
    9. Tobias Adrian & Hyun Song Shin, 2008. "Liquidity, monetary policy, and financial cycles," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 14(Jan).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jagjit S. Chadha & Elisa Newby, 2013. "’Midas, transmuting all, into paper’: the Bank of England and the Banque de France during the Napoleonic Wars," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1330, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Thomas Jobert & Alexandru Monahov & Anna Tykhonenko, 2014. "Domestic Credit in Times of Supervision: An Empirical Investigation of European Countries," GREDEG Working Papers 2014-30, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    3. Jagjit S Chadha & Luisa Corrado & Jack Meaning, 2012. "Reserves, liquidity and money: an assessment of balance sheet policies," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Are central bank balance sheets in Asia too large?, volume 66, pages 294-347 Bank for International Settlements.
    4. de Haan, Leo & van den End, Jan Willem, 2013. "Bank liquidity, the maturity ladder, and regulation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 3930-3950.
    5. Jagjit Chadha & Young-Kwan Kang, 2016. "Finance and Credit in a Model of Monetary Policy," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 471, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    6. Jagjit S. Chadha, 2014. "Financial frictions and macroeconomic models: a tour d'horizon," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 80-98, April.
    7. Bratsiotis, George J., 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits Channel," EconStor Preprints 172770, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    8. Jan Willem Van den End, 2016. "A macroprudential approach to address liquidity risk with the loan-to-deposit ratio," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 237-253, February.
    9. Sinclair, Peter & Sun, Lixn, 2014. "A DSGE Model for China’s Monetary and Macroprudential Policies," MPRA Paper 62580, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. repec:eee:finsta:v:33:y:2017:i:c:p:133-149 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Matteo Falagiarda, 2014. "Evaluating quantitative easing: a DSGE approach," International Journal of Monetary Economics and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 7(4), pages 302-327.
    12. George J. Bratsiotis, 2016. "Liquidity Regulation, Monetary Policy and Welfare," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 228, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    13. George J. Bratsiotis & William J. Tayler & Roy Zilberman, 2014. "Financial Regulation, Credit and Liquidity Policy and the Business Cycle," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 196, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    14. George J. Bratsiotis, 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 236, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Liquidity; Interest on reserves; Policy instruments; Basel;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers

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