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Knowledge base determinants of technology sourcing in clean development mechanism projects

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  • Doranova, Asel
  • Costa, Ionara
  • Duysters, Geert

Abstract

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is one of the three greenhouse gas emission reduction and trading instruments of the Kyoto Protocol (KP). The CDM allows governments and business entities from developed countries to offset their emissions liabilities by reducing or avoiding emissions in developing countries, where it is often cheaper to do so. Our results reveal that the majority of the CDM projects utilise local sources of technology. We attempt to explain technology sourcing patterns in CDM projects through the use of knowledge based determinants. Our empirical analysis indicates that in countries with a stronger knowledge base in climate friendly technologies, CDM project implementers tend to use local, as well as a combination of local and foreign technologies, more than foreign technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • Doranova, Asel & Costa, Ionara & Duysters, Geert, 2010. "Knowledge base determinants of technology sourcing in clean development mechanism projects," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 5550-5559, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:10:p:5550-5559
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Aleluia, João & Leitão, João, 2009. "International Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer: The CDM´s Reality in China," MPRA Paper 16150, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Sawhney, Aparna & Rahul, M., 2014. "Examining the regional pattern of renewable energy CDM power projects in India," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 240-247.
    3. Bodas Freitas, Isabel Maria & Dantas, Eva & Iizuka, Michiko, 2012. "The Kyoto mechanisms and the diffusion of renewable energy technologies in the BRICS," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 118-128.
    4. Kang, Moon Jung & Park, Jihyoun, 2013. "Analysis of the partnership network in the clean development mechanism," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 543-553.
    5. Lema, Adrian & Lema, Rasmus, 2016. "Low-carbon innovation and technology transfer in latecomer countries: Insights from solar PV in the clean development mechanism," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 223-236.
    6. David Popp, 2012. "The Role of Technological Change in Green Growth," NBER Working Papers 18506, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Daniela Marconi & Francesca Sanna-Randaccio, 2012. "The clean development mechanism and technology transfer to China," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 129, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    8. Popp, David, 2012. "The role of technological change in green growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6239, The World Bank.
    9. Patrick Bayer & Johannes Urpelainen & Alice Xu, 2016. "Explaining differences in sub-national patterns of clean technology transfer to China and India," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 261-283, April.

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