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Technology transfer by CDM projects: A comparison of Brazil, China, India and Mexico

  • Antoine Dechezleprêtre

    ()

    (CERNA - Centre d'économie industrielle - Mines ParisTech)

  • Matthieu Glachant

    (CERNA - Centre d'économie industrielle - Mines ParisTech)

  • Yann Ménière

    ()

    (CERNA - Centre d'économie industrielle - Mines ParisTech)

In a companion paper [Dechezleprêtre, A., Glachant, M., Ménière, Y., 2008. The Clean Development Mechanism and the international diffusion of technologies: An empirical study, Energy Policy 36, 1273–1283], we gave a general description of technology transfers by Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects and we analyzed their drivers. In this paper, we use the same data and similar econometric models to explain inter-country differences. We focus on 4 countries gathering about 75% of the CDM projects: Brazil, China, India and Mexico. Sixty eight percent of Mexican projects include an international transfer of technology. The rates are, respectively, 12%, 40% and 59% for India, Brazil and China. Our results show that transfers to Mexico and Brazil are mainly related to the strong involvement of foreign partners and good technological capabilities. Besides a relative advantage with respect to these factors, the higher rate of international transfers in Mexico seems to be due to a sector-composition effect. The involvement of foreign partners is less frequent in India and China, where investment opportunities generated by fast growing economies seem to play a more important role in facilitating international technology transfers through the CDM. International transfers are also related to strong technology capabilities in China. In contrast, the lower rate of international transfer (12%) in India may be due to a better capability to diffuse domestic technologies.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number hal-00437547.

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Date of creation: Feb 2009
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Publication status: Published, Energy Policy, 2009, 37, 2, 703-711
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00437547
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://hal-ensmp.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00437547/en/
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  1. Blackman, Allen, 1999. "The Economics of Technology Diffusion: Implications for Climate Policy in Developing Countries," Discussion Papers dp-99-42, Resources For the Future.
  2. Antoine Dechezleprêtre & Matthieu Glachant & Yann Ménière, 2008. "The Clean Development Mechanism and the International Diffusion of Technologies: An Empirical Study," Post-Print hal-00397198, HAL.
  3. Yang, Zili, 1999. "Should the north make unilateral technology transfers to the south?: North-South cooperation and conflicts in responses to global climate change," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 67-87, January.
  4. Schneider, Malte & Holzer, Andreas & Hoffmann, Volker H., 2008. "Understanding the CDM's contribution to technology transfer," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 2920-2928, August.
  5. Yang, Zili & Nordhaus, William D., 2006. "Magnitude and direction of technological transfers for mitigating GHG emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5-6), pages 730-741, November.
  6. Daniele Archibugi & Alberto Coco, 2004. "A New Indicator of Technological Capabilities for Developed and Developing Countries (ArCo)," CEIS Research Paper 44, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
  7. Ockwell, David G. & Watson, Jim & MacKerron, Gordon & Pal, Prosanto & Yamin, Farhana, 2008. "Key policy considerations for facilitating low carbon technology transfer to developing countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 4104-4115, November.
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