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Greenhouse gas mitigation in a carbon constrained world: The role of carbon capture and storage

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  • Praetorius, Barbara
  • Schumacher, Katja

Abstract

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) promises to allow for low-emissions fossil-fuel-based power generation. The technology is under development; a number of technological, economic, environmental and safety issues remain to be solved. CCS may prolong the prevailing coal-to-electricity regime and countervail efforts in other mitigation categories. Given the need to continue using fossil-fuels for some time, however, it may also serve as a bridging technology towards a renewable energy future. In this paper, we analyze the structural characteristics of the CCS innovation system and perform an energy-environment-economic analysis of the potential contribution of CCS, using a general equilibrium model for Germany. We show that a given climate target can be achieved at lower marginal costs when the option of CCS is included into the mix of mitigation options. We conclude that, given an appropriate legal and policy framework, CCS, energy efficiency and some other mitigation efforts are complementary measures and should form part of a broad mix of measures required for a successful CO2 mitigation strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Praetorius, Barbara & Schumacher, Katja, 2009. "Greenhouse gas mitigation in a carbon constrained world: The role of carbon capture and storage," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5081-5093, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:12:p:5081-5093
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    1. Unruh, Gregory C. & Carrillo-Hermosilla, Javier, 2006. "Globalizing carbon lock-in," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1185-1197, July.
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    6. Schumacher, Katja & Sands, Ronald D., 2006. "Innovative energy technologies and climate policy in Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(18), pages 3929-3941, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kemp-Benedict, Eric, 2013. "Resource Return on Investment under Markup Pricing," MPRA Paper 49154, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Rübbelke, Dirk & Vögele, Stefan, 2013. "Effects of carbon dioxide capture and storage in Germany on European electricity exchange and welfare," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 582-588.
    3. Arvesen, Anders & Bright, Ryan M. & Hertwich, Edgar G., 2011. "Considering only first-order effects? How simplifications lead to unrealistic technology optimism in climate change mitigation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7448-7454.
    4. Setiawan, Andri D. & Cuppen, Eefje, 2013. "Stakeholder perspectives on carbon capture and storage in Indonesia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1188-1199.
    5. Wang, Bing & Kocaoglu, Dundar F. & Daim, Tugrul U. & Yang, Jiting, 2010. "A decision model for energy resource selection in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 7130-7141, November.
    6. Soren Lindner & Sonja Peterson & Wilhelm Windhorst, 2010. "An economic and environmental assessment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) power plants: a case study for the City of Kiel," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(8), pages 1069-1088.
    7. Vögele, Stefan & Rübbelke, Dirk, 2013. "Decisions on investments in photovoltaics and carbon capture and storage: A comparison between two different greenhouse gas control strategies," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 385-392.
    8. Bowen, Frances, 2011. "Carbon capture and storage as a corporate technology strategy challenge," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2256-2264, May.
    9. Barbara Koelbl & Machteld Broek & André Faaij & Detlef Vuuren, 2014. "Uncertainty in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) deployment projections: a cross-model comparison exercise," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 461-476, April.
    10. Rogge, Karoline S. & Hoffmann, Volker H., 2010. "The impact of the EU ETS on the sectoral innovation system for power generation technologies - Findings for Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(12), pages 7639-7652, December.
    11. Chicco, Gianfranco & Stephenson, Paule M., 2012. "Effectiveness of setting cumulative carbon dioxide emissions reduction targets," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 19-31.

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