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Implications of technological learning on the prospects for renewable energy technologies in Europe


  • Uyterlinde, Martine A.
  • Junginger, Martin
  • de Vries, Hage J.
  • Faaij, Andre P.C.
  • Turkenburg, Wim C.


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  • Uyterlinde, Martine A. & Junginger, Martin & de Vries, Hage J. & Faaij, Andre P.C. & Turkenburg, Wim C., 2007. "Implications of technological learning on the prospects for renewable energy technologies in Europe," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 4072-4087, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:35:y:2007:i:8:p:4072-4087

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Colpier, Ulrika Claeson & Cornland, Deborah, 2002. "The economics of the combined cycle gas turbine--an experience curve analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 309-316, March.
    2. Verbruggen, Aviel, 2004. "Tradable green certificates in Flanders (Belgium)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 165-176, January.
    3. Morthorst, P. E., 2000. "The development of a green certificate market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(15), pages 1085-1094, December.
    4. McDonald, Alan & Schrattenholzer, Leo, 2001. "Learning rates for energy technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 255-261, March.
    5. Argote, L. & Epple, D., 1990. "Learning Curves In Manufacturing," GSIA Working Papers 89-90-02, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
    6. Miketa, Asami & Schrattenholzer, Leo, 2004. "Experiments with a methodology to model the role of R&D expenditures in energy technology learning processes; first results," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(15), pages 1679-1692, October.
    7. van der Zwaan, B. C. C. & Gerlagh, R. & G. & Klaassen & Schrattenholzer, L., 2002. "Endogenous technological change in climate change modelling," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 1-19, January.
    8. Stephen C Peck & Thomas J. Teisberg, 1992. "CETA: A Model for Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 55-78.
    9. Daniëls, B.W. & Uyterlinde, M.A., 2005. "ADMIRE-REBUS: modeling the European market for renewable electricity," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 30(14), pages 2596-2616.
    10. Nordhaus, William D., 1993. "Rolling the 'DICE': an optimal transition path for controlling greenhouse gases," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 27-50, March.
    11. Klaassen, Ger & Miketa, Asami & Larsen, Katarina & Sundqvist, Thomas, 2005. "The impact of R&D on innovation for wind energy in Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 227-240, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Taseska, Verica & Markovska, Natasa & Callaway, John M., 2012. "Evaluation of climate change impacts on energy demand," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 88-95.
    2. del Río, Pablo, 2011. "Analysing future trends of renewable electricity in the EU in a low-carbon context," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 2520-2533, June.
    3. Verbruggen, Aviel, 2008. "Renewable and nuclear power: A common future?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 4036-4047, November.
    4. Aviral Kumar Tiwari, 2011. "Comparative performance of renewable and nonrenewable energy source on economic growth and CO2 emissions of Europe and Eurasian countries: A PVAR approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2356-2372.
    5. repec:eee:appene:v:197:y:2017:i:c:p:29-39 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Traber, Thure & Kemfert, Claudia, 2011. "Refunding ETS proceeds to spur the diffusion of renewable energies: An analysis based on the dynamic oligopolistic electricity market model EMELIE," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 33-41, January.
    7. Chen, Qixin & Kang, Chongqing & Xia, Qing & Guan, Dabo, 2011. "Preliminary exploration on low-carbon technology roadmap of China’s power sector," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 1500-1512.
    8. Yücel, Gönenç & van Daalen, Cornelia, 2012. "A simulation-based analysis of transition pathways for the Dutch electricity system," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 557-568.
    9. Nemet, Gregory F., 2009. "Interim monitoring of cost dynamics for publicly supported energy technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 825-835, March.
    10. Menegaki, Angeliki N., 2011. "Growth and renewable energy in Europe: A random effect model with evidence for neutrality hypothesis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 257-263, March.
    11. Gupta, Sandeep Kumar & Purohit, Pallav, 2013. "Renewable energy certificate mechanism in India: A preliminary assessment," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 380-392.
    12. Harmsen, Robert & Graus, Wina, 2013. "How much CO2 emissions do we reduce by saving electricity? A focus on methods," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 803-812.
    13. Festel, Gunter & Würmseher, Martin & Rammer, Christian & Boles, Eckhard & Bellof, Martin, 2013. "Modelling production cost scenarios for biofuels and fossil fuels in Europe," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-075, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    14. Dedinec, Aleksandar & Taseska-Gjorgievska, Verica & Markovska, Natasa & Pop-Jordanov, Jordan & Kanevce, Gligor & Goldstein, Gary & Pye, Steve & Taleski, Rubin, 2016. "Low emissions development pathways of the Macedonian energy sector," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 1202-1211.
    15. He, Yongxiu & Xu, Yang & Pang, Yuexia & Tian, Huiying & Wu, Rui, 2016. "A regulatory policy to promote renewable energy consumption in China: Review and future evolutionary path," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 695-705.
    16. Lee, Chul-Yong & Huh, Sung-Yoon, 2017. "Forecasting new and renewable energy supply through a bottom-up approach: The case of South Korea," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 207-217.
    17. Dandres, Thomas & Gaudreault, Caroline & Tirado-Seco, Pablo & Samson, Réjean, 2012. "Macroanalysis of the economic and environmental impacts of a 2005–2025 European Union bioenergy policy using the GTAP model and life cycle assessment," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 1180-1192.
    18. Menegaki, Angeliki N., 2012. "A social marketing mix for renewable energy in Europe based on consumer stated preference surveys," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 30-39.
    19. Menten, Fabio & Tchung-Ming, Stéphane & Lorne, Daphné & Bouvart, Frédérique, 2015. "Lessons from the use of a long-term energy model for consequential life cycle assessment: The BTL case," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 942-960.

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