IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/rensus/v13y2009i8p2031-2040.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The diffusion of renewable electricity in the presence of climate policy and technology learning: The case of Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Pettersson, Fredrik
  • Söderholm, Patrik

Abstract

The overall objective of this paper is to analyze the impact of climate policy and technology learning on future investments in the Swedish power sector. Methodologically we assess the lifetime engineering costs of different power generation technologies in Sweden, and analyze the impact of carbon pricing on the competitive cost position of these technologies under varying rate-of-return requirements. We also argue that technological learning in the Swedish power sector - not the least in the case of wind power - is strongly related to the presence of international learning and R&D spillovers, and for this reason capacity expansions abroad have important influences of the future cost of power generation in Sweden. The results suggest that renewable power will benefit from existing EU climate policy measures, but overall additional policy instruments (e.g., green certificate schemes) are also needed to stimulate the diffusion of renewable power. Moreover, under a recent European Commission scenario and using estimated learning rates for wind power and the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT), wind power gains considerable competitive ground due to international technology learning impacts. These latter results are, however, very sensitive to the assumed learning-by-doing rates for wind power and CCGT, respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Pettersson, Fredrik & Söderholm, Patrik, 2009. "The diffusion of renewable electricity in the presence of climate policy and technology learning: The case of Sweden," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 13(8), pages 2031-2040, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:13:y:2009:i:8:p:2031-2040
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364-0321(09)00037-9
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Colpier, Ulrika Claeson & Cornland, Deborah, 2002. "The economics of the combined cycle gas turbine--an experience curve analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 309-316, March.
    2. McDonald, Alan & Schrattenholzer, Leo, 2001. "Learning rates for energy technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 255-261, March.
    3. Coe, David T. & Helpman, Elhanan, 1995. "International R&D spillovers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 859-887, May.
    4. Rasmussen, Tobias N., 2001. "CO2 abatement policy with learning-by-doing in renewable energy," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 297-325, October.
    5. Unger, Thomas & Ahlgren, Erik O., 2005. "Impacts of a common green certificate market on electricity and CO2-emission markets in the Nordic countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(16), pages 2152-2163, November.
    6. Argote, L. & Epple, D., 1990. "Learning Curves In Manufacturing," GSIA Working Papers 89-90-02, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
    7. Patrik Söderholm & Ger Klaassen, 2007. "Wind Power in Europe: A Simultaneous Innovation–Diffusion Model," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 36(2), pages 163-190, February.
    8. GERALD R. BEMIS & MICHAEL DoANGELIS, 1990. "Levelized Cost Of Electricity Generation Technologies," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 8(3), pages 200-214, July.
    9. Avinash K. Dixit & Robert S. Pindyck, 1994. "Investment under Uncertainty," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 5474, October.
    10. Junginger, M. & Faaij, A. & Turkenburg, W. C., 2005. "Global experience curves for wind farms," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 133-150, January.
    11. Kolev, Atanas & Riess, Armin, 2007. "Environmental and technology externalities: policy and investment implications," EIB Papers 12/2007, European Investment Bank, Economics Department.
    12. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1962. "The Economic Implications of Learning by Doing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(3), pages 155-173.
    13. Nikolaos Kouvaritakis & Antonio Soria & Stephane Isoard, 2000. "Modelling energy technology dynamics: methodology for adaptive expectations models with learning by doing and learning by searching," International Journal of Global Energy Issues, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 14(1/2/3/4), pages 104-115.
    14. Klaassen, Ger & Miketa, Asami & Larsen, Katarina & Sundqvist, Thomas, 2005. "The impact of R&D on innovation for wind energy in Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 227-240, August.
    15. Pena-Torres, Julio & Pearson, Peter J. G., 2000. "Carbon abatement and new investment in liberalised electricity markets: a nuclear revival in the UK?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 115-135, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Söderholm, Patrik & Pettersson, Maria, 2011. "Offshore wind power policy and planning in Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 518-525, February.
    2. Bergek, Anna & Mignon, Ingrid & Sundberg, Gunnel, 2013. "Who invests in renewable electricity production? Empirical evidence and suggestions for further research," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 568-581.
    3. Pettersson, Maria & Ek, Kristina & Söderholm, Kristina & Söderholm, Patrik, 2010. "Wind power planning and permitting: Comparative perspectives from the Nordic countries," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 14(9), pages 3116-3123, December.
    4. Enevoldsen, Peter & Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2016. "Examining the social acceptance of wind energy: Practical guidelines for onshore wind project development in France," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 178-184.
    5. Mignon, Ingrid & Bergek, Anna, 2016. "Investments in renewable electricity production: The importance of policy revisited," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 307-316.
    6. Enevoldsen, Peter, 2016. "Onshore wind energy in Northern European forests: Reviewing the risks," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1251-1262.
    7. Bass, Robert J. & Malalasekera, Weeratunge & Willmot, Peter & Versteeg, Henk K., 2011. "The impact of variable demand upon the performance of a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plant," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 1956-1965.
    8. Wiebe, Kirsten S. & Lutz, Christian, 2016. "Endogenous technological change and the policy mix in renewable power generation," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 739-751.
    9. Elshkaki, Ayman & Graedel, T.E., 2014. "Dysprosium, the balance problem, and wind power technology," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 548-559.
    10. Uba, Katrin, 2010. "Who formulates renewable-energy policy? A Swedish example," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 6674-6683, November.
    11. Lindman, Åsa & Söderholm, Patrik, 2016. "Wind energy and green economy in Europe: Measuring policy-induced innovation using patent data," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 179(C), pages 1351-1359.
    12. Krook Riekkola, Anna & Ahlgren, Erik O. & Söderholm, Patrik, 2011. "Ancillary benefits of climate policy in a small open economy: The case of Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 4985-4998, September.
    13. Wu, Jung-Hua & Huang, Yun-Hsun, 2014. "Electricity portfolio planning model incorporating renewable energy characteristics," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 278-287.
    14. Zhao, Zhen-yu & Sun, Guang-zheng & Zuo, Jian & Zillante, George, 2013. "The impact of international forces on the Chinese wind power industry," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 131-141.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:13:y:2009:i:8:p:2031-2040. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/600126/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.