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Electricity and Markets

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  • Richard Green

Abstract

Over the last 15 years, an increasing number of electricity industries has replaced vertical integration with markets as the main method of organizing production. Electrical energy is traded in many European and US markets, while the USA also has markets for generating capacity. US generators can reduce the cost of complying with environmental regulations by trading emissions of sulphur dioxide, while Europe has just started a carbon-dioxide emissions-trading scheme. This article discusses the way in which these markets put economic principles into practice. In particular, it shows that several different market designs can provide theoretically equivalent incentives for generators to build capacity, and that emissions trading may have unexpected impacts upon electricity prices. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Green, 2005. "Electricity and Markets," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 67-87, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:21:y:2005:i:1:p:67-87
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:eneeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:304-314 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Skoufa, Lucas & Tamaschke, Rick, 2011. "Carbon prices, institutions, technology and electricity generation firms in two Australian states," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2606-2614, May.
    3. Ueckerdt, Falko & Hirth, Lion & Luderer, Gunnar & Edenhofer, Ottmar, 2013. "System LCOE: What are the costs of variable renewables?," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 61-75.
    4. Hirth, Lion & Ueckerdt, Falko, 2013. "Redistribution effects of energy and climate policy: The electricity market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 934-947.
    5. Ueckerdt, Falko & Brecha, Robert & Luderer, Gunnar, 2015. "Analyzing major challenges of wind and solar variability in power systems," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 1-10.
    6. Scheele, Ulrich, 2007. "Privatisierung, Liberalisierung und Deregulierung in netzgebundenen Infrastruktursektoren," Forschungs- und Sitzungsberichte der ARL: Aufsätze,in: Wandel der Stromversorgung und räumliche Politik, pages 35-67 Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung (ARL) - Leibniz-Forum für Raumwissenschaften.
    7. Simona Bigerna and Carlo Andrea Bollino, 2016. "Optimal Price Design in the Wholesale Electricity Market," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Bollino-M).
    8. Wolfgang Buchholz & Jonas Frank & Hans-Dieter Karl & Johannes Pfeiffer & Karen Pittel & Ursula Triebswetter & Jochen Habermann & Wolfgang Mauch & Thomas Staudacher, 2012. "Die Zukunft der Energiemärkte: Ökonomische Analyse und Bewertung von Potenzialen und Handlungsmöglichkeiten," ifo Forschungsberichte, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 57, October.
    9. Grossi, Luigi & Heim, Sven & Waterson, Michael, 2014. "A vision of the European energy future? The impact of the German response to the Fukushima earthquake," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1047, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    10. Hirth, Lion & Ueckerdt, Falko & Edenhofer, Ottmar, 2015. "Integration costs revisited – An economic framework for wind and solar variability," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 925-939.
    11. De Jonghe, Cedric & Delarue, Erik & Belmans, Ronnie & D'haeseleer, William, 2011. "Determining optimal electricity technology mix with high level of wind power penetration," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(6), pages 2231-2238, June.
    12. Lion Hirth, Falko Ueckerdt, and Ottmar Edenhofer, 2016. "Why Wind Is Not Coal: On the Economics of Electricity Generation," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    13. Dieter Helm, 2005. "Economic Instruments and Environmental Policy," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 36(3), pages 205-228.
    14. Lion Hirth, 2015. "The Optimal Share of Variable Renewables: How the Variability of Wind and Solar Power affects their Welfare-optimal Deployment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).
    15. repec:eee:energy:v:127:y:2017:i:c:p:479-488 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Mark Lijesen, 2004. "Increasing the reliability of electricity production: a cost-benefit analysis," CPB Document 52, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

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