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Can urban rail transit curb automobile energy consumption?

Listed author(s):
  • Lin, Boqiang
  • Du, Zhili
Registered author(s):

    With the rapid development of China's economy and the speed of urbanization, China's automobile sector has experienced rapid development. The rapid development of the automobile sector has increased energy consumption. According to the results of this paper, automobile energy consumption accounted for about 10.73% of total energy consumption in China in 2015, about 3.6 times the proportion a decade ago. With the deterioration of urban traffic conditions, relying on expanding the amount of vehicles and city road network cannot solve the problem. Urban rail transit is energy-saving and less-polluting, uses less space, has large capacity, and secure. Urban rail transit, according to the principle of sustainable development, is a green transportation system and should be especially adopted for large and medium-sized cities. The paper uses the binary choice model (Probit and Logit) to analyze the main factors influencing the development of rail transit in Chinese cities, and whether automobile energy consumption is the reason for the construction of urban rail transit. Secondly, we analyze the influence of urban rail transit on automobile energy consumption using DID model. The results indicate that the construction of urban rail traffic can restrain automobile energy consumption significantly, with continuous impact in the second year.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421517301131
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 105 (2017)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 120-127

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:105:y:2017:i:c:p:120-127
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.02.038
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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