IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ehbiol/v10y2012i3p221-231.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Undernutrition, subsequent risk of mortality and civil war in Burundi

Author

Listed:
  • Verwimp, Philip

Abstract

The paper investigates the effect of child undernutrition on the risk of mortality in Burundi. Using anthropometric data from a longitudinal survey (1998–2007) we find that undernourished children, measured by the height-for-age z-scores (HAZ) in 1998 had a higher probability to die during subsequent years. In order to address the problem of omitted variables correlated with both nutritional status and the risk of mortality, we use the length of exposure to civil war prior to 1998 as a source of exogenous variation in a child's nutritional status. Children exposed to civil war in their area of residence have worse nutritional status. The results indicate that one year of exposure translates into a 0.15 decrease in the HAZ, resulting in a 10% increase in the probability to die. For boys, we find a 0.34 decrease in HAZ per year of exposure, resulting in 25% increase in the probability to die. For girls, the results are statistically not significant at the usual thresholds. We show the robustness of our results and we derive policy conclusion for a nutrition intervention in times of conflict.

Suggested Citation

  • Verwimp, Philip, 2012. "Undernutrition, subsequent risk of mortality and civil war in Burundi," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 221-231.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:10:y:2012:i:3:p:221-231
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2011.09.007
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X11000980
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:ags:stataj:119292 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Harold Alderman & John Hoddinott & Bill Kinsey, 2006. "Long term consequences of early childhood malnutrition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 450-474, July.
    3. Alderman, Harold & Lokshin, Michael & Radyakin, Sergiy, 2011. "Tall claims: Mortality selection and the height of children in India," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 393-406.
    4. James J. Heckman, 2008. "Econometric Causality," International Statistical Review, International Statistical Institute, vol. 76(1), pages 1-27, April.
    5. Tom Bundervoet & Philip Verwimp & Richard Akresh, 2009. "Health and Civil War in Rural Burundi," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(2).
    6. Austin Nichols, 2007. "Causal inference with observational data," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(4), pages 507-541, December.
    7. International Monetary Fund, 2007. "Burundi; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper," IMF Staff Country Reports 07/46, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Imbens, Guido W & Angrist, Joshua D, 1994. "Identification and Estimation of Local Average Treatment Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(2), pages 467-475, March.
    9. Mu, Ren & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2011. "Why does the Great Chinese Famine affect the male and female survivors differently? Mortality selection versus son preference," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 92-105, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tilman Brück & Patricia Justino & Philip Verwimp & Andrew Tedesco & Alexandra Avdeenko, 2013. "Measuring Conflict Exposure in Micro-Level Surveys," HiCN Working Papers 153, Households in Conflict Network.
    2. Lionel Jeusette & Philip Verwimp, 2017. "Childhood aspirations, occupational outcomes and exposure to violence: Evidence from Burundi," HiCN Working Papers 247, Households in Conflict Network.
    3. Philip Verwimp & Juan Carlos Muñoz-Mora, 2013. "Returning Home after Civil War: Food security, nutrition and poverty among Burundian households," HiCN Working Papers 123, Households in Conflict Network.
    4. von Grebmer, Klaus & Bernstein, Jill & Nabarro, David & Prasai, Nilam & Amin, Shazia & Yohannes, Yisehac & Sonntag, Andrea & Patterson, Fraser, 2016. "Indice Globale della Fame 2016: Obiettivo Fame Zero," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-230-7.
    5. von Grebmer, Klaus & Bernstein, Jill & Nabarro, David & Prasai, Nilam & Amin, Shazia & Yohannes, Yisehac & Sonntag, Andrea & Patterson, Fraser, 2016. "2016 Global hunger index: Getting to zero hunger," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-226-0.
    6. Philip Verwimp, 2012. "Returning Home after Civil War: The Consequences of Forced Displacement for Food Security, Nutrition and Poverty among Burundese Households," Working Papers CEB 12-027, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    7. Nepal, Apsara Karki & Halla, Martin & Stillman, Steven, 2018. "Violent Conflict and the Child Quantity-Quality Tradeoff," IZA Discussion Papers 11690, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Minoiu, Camelia & Shemyakina, Olga N., 2014. "Armed conflict, household victimization, and child health in Côte d'Ivoire," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 237-255.
    9. Anton Parlow, 2016. "State and Development: Child Mortality and the War on Terror: Afghanistan from 2007 to 2010," HiCN Working Papers 220, Households in Conflict Network.
    10. Philip Verwimp, 2012. "Returning Home after Civil War: The Consequences of Forced Displacement for Food Security, Nutrition and Poverty among Burundese Households," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2012-033, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    11. Tilman Brück & Patricia Justino & Philip Verwimp & Alexandra Avdeenko & Andrew Tedesco, 2016. "Measuring Violent Conflict in Micro-level Surveys: Current Practices and Methodological Challenges," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 31(1), pages 29-58.
    12. von Grebmer, Klaus & Bernstein, Jill & Nabarro, David & Prasai, Nilam & Amin, Shazia & Yohannes, Yisehac & Sonntag, Andrea & Patterson, Fraser, 2016. "Indice de la faim dans le monde 2016 : Atteindre l’Objectif Faim Zéro," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-232-1.
    13. repec:kap:jfamec:v:38:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10834-016-9499-y is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:fpr:ifprib:9780896292710 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Nathalie E. J. Dijkman & Catrien Bijleveld & Philip Verwimp, 2014. "Sexual Violence in Burundi: Victims, perpetrators, and the role of conflict," HiCN Working Papers 172, Households in Conflict Network.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:10:y:2012:i:3:p:221-231. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.