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Disadvantages of linguistic origin—Evidence from immigrant literacy scores

Listed author(s):
  • Isphording, Ingo E.

This study quantifies the disadvantage in literacy skills that arises from the linguistic distance between their mother tongue and host country language, combining individual cross-country data on literacy scores with unique information on the linguistic distance between languages.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176514000779
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 123 (2014)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 236-239

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:123:y:2014:i:2:p:236-239
DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2014.02.013
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Christian Dustmann & Arthur van Soest, 2001. "Language Fluency And Earnings: Estimation With Misclassified Language Indicators," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(4), pages 663-674, November.
  2. Alicia Adsera & Mariola Pytlikova, 2012. "The role of language in shaping international migration," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2012014, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Isphording, Ingo E. & Otten, Sebastian, 2014. "Linguistic barriers in the destination language acquisition of immigrants," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 30-50.
  4. Anna Vignoles & Augustin De Coulon & Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez, 2011. "The value of basic skills in the British labour market," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(1), pages 27-48, January.
  5. Ross Finnie & Ronald Meng, 2005. "Literacy and labour market outcomes: self-assessment versus test score measures," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(17), pages 1935-1951.
  6. Charette, Michael & Meng, Ronald, 1994. "Explaining language proficiency : Objective versus self-assessed measures of literacy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 313-321.
  7. Friedberg, Rachel M, 2000. "You Can't Take It with You? Immigrant Assimilation and the Portability of Human Capital," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(2), pages 221-251, April.
  8. Dougherty, Christopher, 2003. "Numeracy, literacy and earnings: evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 511-521, October.
  9. A. Gonzalez, 2000. "The acquisition and labor market value of four English skills: new evidence from NALS," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(3), pages 259-269, July.
  10. Gil S. Epstein & Ira N. Gang, 2010. "Migration and Culture," Working Papers 2010-17, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
  11. Chiswick, Barry R & Miller, Paul W, 1995. "The Endogeneity between Language and Earnings: International Analyses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 246-288, April.
  12. Lohmann, Johannes, 2011. "Do language barriers affect trade?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 110(2), pages 159-162, February.
  13. Isphording, Ingo & Sinning, Mathias, 2012. "The Returns to Language Skills in the US Labor Market," Ruhr Economic Papers 391, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  14. Lawrence M. Kahn, 2004. "Immigration, skills and the labor market: International evidence," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(3), pages 501-534, August.
  15. repec:zbw:rwirep:0274 is not listed on IDEAS
  16. Ingo Eduard Isphording & Sebastian Otten, 2013. "The Costs of Babylon—Linguistic Distance in Applied Economics," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(2), pages 354-369, May.
  17. Hoyt Bleakley & Aimee Chin, 2004. "Language Skills and Earnings: Evidence from Childhood Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(2), pages 481-496, May.
  18. Ana Ferrer & David A. Green & W. Craig Riddell, 2006. "The Effect of Literacy on Immigrant Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
  19. repec:zbw:rwirep:0337 is not listed on IDEAS
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