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Immigration, skills and the labor market: International evidence

Author

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  • Lawrence M. Kahn

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Abstract

Using the 1994–1998 International Adult Literacy Survey, this paper compares cognitive skills and employment of immigrants in Canada, New Zealand, Switzerland, and the United States. Immigrants had lower cognitive test scores than natives in each country, with the largest gaps in the US, and small gaps in Canada and New Zealand. Male immigrants in the US were no less likely to work than natives, while in the other countries, male immigrants were less likely to be employed. Female immigrants were less likely in each country to be employed than natives, with an especially large gap for the US. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2004

Suggested Citation

  • Lawrence M. Kahn, 2004. "Immigration, skills and the labor market: International evidence," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(3), pages 501-534, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:17:y:2004:i:3:p:501-534
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-003-0151-4
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Isphording, Ingo E., 2014. "Disadvantages of linguistic origin—Evidence from immigrant literacy scores," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(2), pages 236-239.
    2. Heather Antecol & Peter Kuhn & Stephen J. Trejo, 2006. "Assimilation via Prices or Quantities?: Sources of Immigrant Earnings Growth in Australia, Canada, and the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(4).
    3. Barrett, Alan & McGinnitty, Frances & Quinn, Emma (ed.), 2017. "Monitoring Report on Integration 2016," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT330.
    4. Susanne Prantl & Alexandra Spitz-Oener, 2013. "Interacting Product and Labor Market Regulation and the Impact of Immigration on Native Wages," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2013_22, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    5. Anabela Carneiro & Natércia Fortuna & José Varejão, 2012. "Immigrants at new destinations: how they fare and why," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 1165-1185, July.
    6. Lind, Patrik & Mellander, Erik, 2016. "Relations between immigration and adult skills: findings based on PIAAC," Working Paper Series 2016:21, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    7. Richard B. Freeman, 2006. "People Flows in Globalization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 145-170, Spring.
    8. Levels, Mark & Dronkers, Jaap & Jencks, Christopher, 2014. "Mind the Gap: Compositional, Cultural and Institutional Explanations for Numeracy Skills Disparities between Adult Immigrants and Natives in Western Countries," Working Paper Series rwp14-020, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    9. Andrew Clarke & Mikal Skuterud, 2016. "A comparative analysis of immigrant skills and their utilization in Australia, Canada, and the USA," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 849-882, July.
    10. Blau, Francine D. & Kahn, Lawrence M., 2012. "Immigration and the Distribution of Incomes," IZA Discussion Papers 6921, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Cim, Merve & Kind, Michael Sebastian & Kleibrink, Jan, 2017. "Occupational mismatch of immigrants in Europe: The role of education and cognitive skills," Ruhr Economic Papers 687, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    12. repec:zbw:rwirep:0397 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Nong Zhu & Cecile Batisse, 2014. "L'effet des politiques sociales sur l'emploi des nouveaux immigrants à Montréal," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-05, CIRANO.
    14. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn & Joan Y. Moriarty & Andre Portela Souza, 2003. "The Role of the Family in Immigrants' Labor-Market Activity: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 429-447, March.
    15. Marco Pecoraro & Didier Ruedin, 2016. "A Foreigner Who Does Not Steal My Job: The Role of Unemployment Risk and Values in Attitudes toward Equal Opportunities," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(3), pages 628-666, September.
    16. Yaqub, Shahin, 2010. "Does age-at-migration in childhood affect migrant socioeconomic achievements in adulthood?," MPRA Paper 27935, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Ingo Isphording, 2013. "Disadvantages of Linguistic Origin – Evidence from Immigrant Literacy Scores," Ruhr Economic Papers 0397, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    J24; J61; Human capital; immigrant workers;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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