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Has US inflation really become harder to forecast?

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  • Lanne, Markku
  • Luoto, Jani

Abstract

Since the mid-1980s, Phillips curve forecasts of US inflation have been inferior to those of a conventional causal autoregression. However, little change in forecast accuracy is detected against the benchmark of a noncausal autoregression, more accurately characterizing US inflation dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Lanne, Markku & Luoto, Jani, 2012. "Has US inflation really become harder to forecast?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(3), pages 383-386.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:115:y:2012:i:3:p:383-386
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2011.12.088
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lanne, Markku & Luoto, Jani & Saikkonen, Pentti, 2012. "Optimal forecasting of noncausal autoregressive time series," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 623-631.
    2. Markku Lanne & Arto Luoma & Jani Luoto, 2012. "Bayesian Model Selection And Forecasting In Noncausal Autoregressive Models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(5), pages 812-830, August.
    3. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2007. "Why Has U.S. Inflation Become Harder to Forecast?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(s1), pages 3-33, February.
    4. Lanne Markku & Saikkonen Pentti, 2011. "Noncausal Autoregressions for Economic Time Series," Journal of Time Series Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 3(3), pages 1-32, October.
    5. Lanne, Markku & Saikkonen, Pentti, 2008. "Modeling Expectations with Noncausal Autoregressions," MPRA Paper 8411, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2007. "Erratum to "Why Has U.S. Inflation Become Harder to Forecast?"," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(7), pages 1849-1849, October.
    7. Andrew Atkeson & Lee E. Ohanian, 2001. "Are Phillips curves useful for forecasting inflation?," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 2-11.
    8. Breid, F. Jay & Davis, Richard A. & Lh, Keh-Shin & Rosenblatt, Murray, 1991. "Maximum likelihood estimation for noncausal autoregressive processes," Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 175-198, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lanne Markku, 2015. "Noncausality and inflation persistence," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 19(4), pages 469-481, September.
    2. Lanne, Markku & Luoto, Jani & Saikkonen, Pentti, 2012. "Optimal forecasting of noncausal autoregressive time series," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 623-631.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation forecast; Noncausal time series; Phillips curve;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation

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