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An empirical assessment of U.S. state-level immigration and environmental emissions

  • Squalli, Jay

This paper uses U.S. state-level data for CO, NO2, SO2, and PM10 emissions and a STIRPAT-inspired model to provide empirical evidence discrediting, at least in part, the restrictionist perspective on the immigration-environment relationship. The paper finds that U.S. states with a larger share of foreign-born residents are associated with lower NO2 and SO2 emissions. While these results do not necessarily imply that immigrants mitigate environmental emissions, they emphasize the importance of addressing the relationship between immigration and the environment based on an objective assessment of facts. Hence, it is this paper's contention that it is empirically unjustifiable to call for restrictions on immigration on environmental grounds.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 69 (2010)
Issue (Month): 5 (March)
Pages: 1170-1175

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:5:p:1170-1175
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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  1. Dinda, Soumyananda, 2004. "Environmental Kuznets Curve Hypothesis: A Survey," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 431-455, August.
  2. Matthew A. Cole & Eric Neumayer, 2003. "Examining the Impact of Demographic Factors On Air Pollution," Labor and Demography 0312005, EconWPA, revised 13 May 2004.
  3. David I. Stern, 2003. "The Rise and Fall of the Environmental Kuznets Curve," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0302, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
  4. Eric Neumayer, 2006. "The environment: one more reason to keep immigrants out?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3275, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. Chapman, Robert L., 2006. "Confessions of a Malthusian restrictionist," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 214-219, September.
  6. Muradian, Roldan, 2006. "Immigration and the environment: Underlying values and scope of analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 208-213, September.
  7. Buchinsky, Moshe, 1995. "Estimating the asymptotic covariance matrix for quantile regression models a Monte Carlo study," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 303-338, August.
  8. Shi, Anqing, 2003. "The impact of population pressure on global carbon dioxide emissions, 1975-1996: evidence from pooled cross-country data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 29-42, February.
  9. Bruce Tonn & Greg Waidley & Carl Petrich, 2001. "The Ageing US Population and Environmental Policy," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(6), pages 851-876.
  10. Roger Koenker & Kevin F. Hallock, 2001. "Quantile Regression," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 143-156, Fall.
  11. Moshe Buchinsky, 1998. "Recent Advances in Quantile Regression Models: A Practical Guideline for Empirical Research," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 88-126.
  12. James Cramer, 1998. "Population growth and air quality in California," Demography, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 45-56, February.
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