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An empirical assessment of U.S. state-level immigration and environmental emissions

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  • Squalli, Jay

Abstract

This paper uses U.S. state-level data for CO, NO2, SO2, and PM10 emissions and a STIRPAT-inspired model to provide empirical evidence discrediting, at least in part, the restrictionist perspective on the immigration-environment relationship. The paper finds that U.S. states with a larger share of foreign-born residents are associated with lower NO2 and SO2 emissions. While these results do not necessarily imply that immigrants mitigate environmental emissions, they emphasize the importance of addressing the relationship between immigration and the environment based on an objective assessment of facts. Hence, it is this paper's contention that it is empirically unjustifiable to call for restrictions on immigration on environmental grounds.

Suggested Citation

  • Squalli, Jay, 2010. "An empirical assessment of U.S. state-level immigration and environmental emissions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 1170-1175, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:5:p:1170-1175
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shi, Anqing, 2003. "The impact of population pressure on global carbon dioxide emissions, 1975-1996: evidence from pooled cross-country data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 29-42, February.
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    8. James Cramer, 1998. "Population growth and air quality in California," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(1), pages 45-56, February.
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    10. Bruce Tonn & Greg Waidley & Carl Petrich, 2001. "The Ageing US Population and Environmental Policy," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(6), pages 851-876.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    2. Pei-Ing Wu & Je-Liang Liou & Hung-Yi Chang, 2015. "Alternative exploration of EKC for $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$ CO 2 emissions: inclusion of meta-technical ratio in quantile regression model," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 57-73, January.
    3. Laureti, Tiziana & Montero, José-María & Fernández-Avilés, Gema, 2014. "A local scale analysis on influencing factors of NOx emissions: Evidence from the Community of Madrid, Spain," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 557-568.
    4. Pascal Da Costa & Wenhui Tian, 2015. "A Sectoral Prospective Analysis of CO2 Emissions in China, USA and France, 2010-2050," Working Papers hal-01026302, HAL.
    5. Shuddhasattwa Rafiq & Ingrid Nielsen & Russell Smyth, 2016. "Effect of Internal Migration on Air and Water Pollution in China," Monash Economics Working Papers 27-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    6. repec:eee:eneeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:31-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Meng, Ming & Niu, Dongxiao & Shang, Wei, 2012. "CO2 emissions and economic development: China's 12th five-year plan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 468-475.
    8. Rafael Morales-Lage & Aurelia Bengochea-Morancho & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, 2016. "The determinants of CO2 emissions: evidence from European countries," Working Papers 2016/04, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    9. Carmel Price & Ben Feldmeyer, 2012. "The Environmental Impact of Immigration: An Analysis of the Effects of Immigrant Concentration on Air Pollution Levels," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(1), pages 119-140, February.
    10. repec:eee:energy:v:127:y:2017:i:c:p:479-488 is not listed on IDEAS

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