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How do Recent Population Trends Matter to Climate Change?

Author

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  • Leiwen Jiang

    ()

  • Karen Hardee

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Leiwen Jiang & Karen Hardee, 2011. "How do Recent Population Trends Matter to Climate Change?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(2), pages 287-312, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:30:y:2011:i:2:p:287-312 DOI: 10.1007/s11113-010-9189-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dalton, Michael & O'Neill, Brian & Prskawetz, Alexia & Jiang, Leiwen & Pitkin, John, 2008. "Population aging and future carbon emissions in the United States," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 642-675, March.
    2. Alexia Prskawetz & Jiang Leiwen & Brian C. O Neill, 2004. "Demographic composition and projections of car use in Austria," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, pages 175-202.
    3. Donald W. Jones, 1989. "Urbanization and Energy Use In Economic Development," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 29-44.
    4. Per Pinstrup-Andersen, 2002. "Food and Agricultural Policy for a Globalizing World: Preparing for the Future," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1201-1214.
    5. Leiwen Jiang & Brian C. O'Neill, 2007. "Impacts of Demographic Trends on US Household Size and Structure," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(3), pages 567-591.
    6. Pachauri, Shonali, 2004. "An analysis of cross-sectional variations in total household energy requirements in India using micro survey data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(15), pages 1723-1735, October.
    7. Pachauri, Shonali & Jiang, Leiwen, 2008. "The household energy transition in India and China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 4022-4035, November.
    8. Alexia Prskawetz & Jiang Leiwen & Brian C. O Neill, 2004. "Demographic composition and projections of car use in Austria," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, pages 175-202.
    9. Matthew A. Cole & Eric Neumayer, 2003. "Examining the Impact of Demographic Factors On Air Pollution," Labor and Demography 0312005, EconWPA, revised 13 May 2004.
    10. Yamasaki, Eiji & Tominaga, Norio, 1997. "Evolution of an aging society and effect on residential energy demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(11), pages 903-912, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Antonio Duro & Jordi Teixidó-Figueras & Emilio Padilla, 2014. "The causal factors of international inequality in co2 emissions per capita: a regression-based inequality decomposition analysis," Working Papers 2014/20, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    2. Björn Kauder & Niklas Potrafke & Heinrich Ursprung, 2016. "Behavioral Determinants of Proclaimed Support for Environment Protection Policies," CESifo Working Paper Series 5993, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. repec:kap:enreec:v:67:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10640-015-9994-x is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Underwood, Anthony & Zahran, Sammy, 2015. "The carbon implications of declining household scale economies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 182-190.
    5. Dasgupta, A. & Dasgupta, P., 2017. "Socially Embedded Preferences, Environmental Externalities, and Reproductive Rights," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1724, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    6. Pani, Ratnakar & Mukhopadhyay, Ujjaini, 2013. "Management accounting approach to analyse energy related CO2 emission: A variance analysis study of top 10 emitters of the world," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 639-655.
    7. Shah Md. Atiqul Haq & Khandaker Jafor Ahmed, 2017. "Does the perception of climate change vary with the socio-demographic dimensions? A study on vulnerable populations in Bangladesh," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 85(3), pages 1759-1785, February.
    8. Zhou, Yang & Liu, Yansui, 2016. "Does population have a larger impact on carbon dioxide emissions than income? Evidence from a cross-regional panel analysis in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 800-809.
    9. repec:ces:ifowps:_254 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Wang, Chengchao & Yang, Yusheng & Zhang, Yaoqi, 2012. "Rural household livelihood change, fuelwood substitution, and hilly ecosystem restoration: Evidence from China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 2475-2482.
    11. repec:eee:touman:v:40:y:2014:i:c:p:273-281 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Wei, Taoyuan, 2011. "What STIRPAT tells about effects of population and affluence on the environment?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 70-74.
    13. Isabel Günther & Kenneth Harttgen, 2016. "Desired Fertility and Number of Children Born Across Time and Space," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(1), pages 55-83, February.
    14. Moutinho, Victor & Moreira, António Carrizo & Silva, Pedro Miguel, 2015. "The driving forces of change in energy-related CO2 emissions in Eastern, Western, Northern and Southern Europe: The LMDI approach to decomposition analysis," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 1485-1499.

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