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The environment: One more reason to keep immigrants out?

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  • Neumayer, Eric

Abstract

Some Neo-Malthusians and anti-immigration groups in the United States have recently argued that migration of people to developed countries is damaging to sustainable development and environmental protection. This paper argues that it is inappropriate and ethically indefensible to employ environmental reasons in support of calls for restrictions on immigration to developed countries. Keeping migrants out neither solves environmental problems nor tackles the root causes of migration. Instead, developed countries should prevent armed conflicts and should promote sustainable development at home and in developing countries. If managed competently and fairly, international migration and other forms of globalization present a promise, not a threat, to a more sustainable world.
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Suggested Citation

  • Neumayer, Eric, 2006. "The environment: One more reason to keep immigrants out?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 204-207, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:59:y:2006:i:2:p:204-207
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2004. "Skilled migration: the perspective of developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3382, The World Bank.
    2. Neumayer, Eric & de Soysa, Indra, 2005. "Trade Openness, Foreign Direct Investment and Child Labor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 43-63, January.
    3. (Various), 2005. "Book Reviews," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 129-136.
    4. Neumayer, Eric, 2004. "The environment, left-wing political orientation and ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(3-4), pages 167-175, December.
    5. Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2004. "Globalization and growth in emerging markets," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 465-484, June.
    6. Matthew A. Cole & Eric Neumayer, 2003. "Examining the Impact of Demographic Factors On Air Pollution," Labor and Demography 0312005, EconWPA, revised 13 May 2004.
    7. (Various), 2005. "Book Reviews," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 117-134.
    8. Abernethy, Virginia, 1993. "The demographic transition revisited: lessons for foreign aid and U.S. immigration policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 235-252, December.
    9. (Various), 2005. "Book Reviews," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    10. Eric Neumayer, 2002. "Does Trade Openness Promote Multilateral Environmental Cooperation?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(6), pages 815-832, June.
    11. Rodrik, Dani, 2004. "Globalization and growth -- looking in the wrong places," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 513-517, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ahmed, Khalid, 2015. "The sheer scale of China’s urban renewal and CO2 emissions: Multiple structural breaks, long-run relationship and short-run dynamics," MPRA Paper 71035, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Tausch, Arno, 2015. "Europe’s Refugee Crisis. Zur aktuellen politischen Ökonomie von Migration, Asyl und Integration in Europa
      [Europe's Refugee Crisis. On the current political economy of migration, asylum and integra
      ," MPRA Paper 67400, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Chapman, Robert L., 2006. "Confessions of a Malthusian restrictionist," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 214-219, September.
    4. Tausch, Arno, 2012. "‚Getting Asylum Seekers into Employment‘? – Ein Allheilmittel für die Europäische Einwanderungspolitik?
      [‚Getting Asylum Seekers into Employment‘? – A panacea for European immigration policy?]
      ," MPRA Paper 40759, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Squalli, Jay, 2010. "An empirical assessment of U.S. state-level immigration and environmental emissions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 1170-1175, March.
    6. Carmel Price & Ben Feldmeyer, 2012. "The Environmental Impact of Immigration: An Analysis of the Effects of Immigrant Concentration on Air Pollution Levels," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(1), pages 119-140, February.

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    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General

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