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Does having a cadre parent pay? Evidence from the first job offers of Chinese college graduates

  • Li, Hongbin
  • Meng, Lingsheng
  • Shi, Xinzheng
  • Wu, Binzhen

We estimate the wage premium associated with having a cadre parent in China using a recent survey of college graduates carried out by the authors. The wage premium of having a cadre parent is 15%, and this premium cannot be explained by other observables such as college entrance exam scores, quality of colleges and majors, a full set of college human capital attributes, and job characteristics. These results suggest that the remaining premium could be the true wage premium of having a cadre parent.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 99 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 513-520

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:99:y:2012:i:2:p:513-520
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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