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Household income mobility in China and its decomposition

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  • Ding, Ning
  • Wang, Yougui

Abstract

Using the data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), we measured the income mobility of households in China from 1989 to 2000. The results are decomposed into three sources: exchange, growth, and dispersion. These results show that the household income mobility in China remained at a high level from 1989 to 2000, which is due to an exchange process accompanied by high growth. Tracing the history of macroeconomic policy in China, we found that the mode of income mobility is closely associated with these policies when the time lag is taken into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Ding, Ning & Wang, Yougui, 2008. "Household income mobility in China and its decomposition," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 373-380, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:19:y:2008:i:3:p:373-380
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Huang, Jing & Wang, Yougui, 2014. "The time-dependent characteristics of relative mobility," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 291-295.
    2. Jianxi Feng & Martin Dijst & Bart Wissink & Jan Prillwitz, 2014. "Understanding Mode Choice in the Chinese Context: The Case of Nanjing Metropolitan Area," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 105(3), pages 315-330, July.
    3. Chamon, Marcos & Liu, Kai & Prasad, Eswar, 2013. "Income uncertainty and household savings in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 164-177.
    4. Duro, Juan Antonio, 2013. "International mobility in carbon dioxide emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 208-216.
    5. Ian Brand-Weiner & Francesca Francavilla & Mattia Olivari, 2015. "Globalisation in Viet Nam: An Opportunity for Social Mobility?," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(1), pages 21-33, January.
    6. Ian Brand-Weiner & Francesca Francavilla, 2015. "Income mobility in times of economic growth: The case of Viet Nam," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 328, OECD Publishing.
    7. Yi Chen & Frank A. Cowell, 2017. "Mobility in China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(2), pages 203-218, June.
    8. Lukiyanova, Anna & Oshchepkov, Aleksey, 2012. "Income mobility in Russia (2000–2005)," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 46-64.
    9. Shuang LI & Ming LU & Hiroshi Sato, 2008. "The Value of Power in China: How Do Party Membership and Social Networks Affect Pay in Different Ownership Sectors?," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd08-011, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    10. Kailash Chandra Pradhan & Shrabani Mukherjee & Shrabani Mukherjee, 2015. "The Income Mobility in Rural India: Evidence From ARIS/ REDS Surveys," Working Papers 2015-109, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
    11. repec:eee:phsmap:v:487:y:2017:i:c:p:143-152 is not listed on IDEAS

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