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Mobility in China

  • Yi Chen
  • Frank A Cowell

We examine the evidence on rank and income mobility in China during the decades immediately preceding and immediately following the millennium using panel data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey. We show that rank mobility changed markedly over the period: in this respect China is becoming markedly more rigid. By contrast income mobility has carried on increasing; so has income inequality.

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Paper provided by Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE in its series STICERD - Public Economics Programme Discussion Papers with number 18.

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Date of creation: Apr 2013
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Handle: RePEc:cep:stippp:18
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  1. Shorrocks, Anthony, 1978. "Income inequality and income mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 376-393, December.
  2. Niny Khor & John Pencavel, 2006. "Income mobility of individuals in China and the United States," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 14(3), pages 417-458, 07.
  3. Philippe Van Kerm, 2004. "What Lies Behind Income Mobility? Reranking and Distributional Change in Belgium, Western Germany and the USA," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71(281), pages 223-239, 05.
  4. Peter Gottschalk & Enrico Spolare, 2001. "On the Evaluation of Economic Mobility," Working Papers 2001-25, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  5. Trede, Mark, 1997. "Making mobility visible: A graphical device," Discussion Papers in Econometrics and Statistics 2/97, University of Cologne, Institute of Econometrics and Statistics.
  6. Honge Gong & Andrew Leigh & Xin Meng, 2012. "Intergenerational Income Mobility In Urban China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 58(3), pages 481-503, 09.
  7. Formby, John P. & Smith, W. James & Zheng, Buhong, 2004. "Mobility measurement, transition matrices and statistical inference," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 181-205, May.
  8. Zhang, Yingqiang & Eriksson, Tor, 2009. "Inequality of Opportunity and Income Inequality in Nine Chinese Provinces, 1989-2006," Working Papers 09-18, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
  9. Dardanoni Valentino, 1993. "Measuring Social Mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 372-394, December.
  10. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 2007. "China's (uneven) progress against poverty," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-42, January.
  11. Frank A. Cowell & Emmanuel Flachaire, 2011. "Measuring Mobility," Working Papers halshs-00586269, HAL.
  12. Xuehua Shi & Alexander Nuetah & Xian Xin, 2009. "Household Income Mobility in Rural China:1989-2006," Working Papers 0901, China Agricultural University, College of Economics and Management.
  13. Xuehua Shi & Xiaoyun Liu & Alexander Nuetah & Xian Xin, 2010. "Determinants of Household Income Mobility in Rural China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 18(2), pages 41-59.
  14. Buhmann, Brigitte, et al, 1988. "Equivalence Scales, Well-Being, Inequality, and Poverty: Sensitivity Estimates across Ten Countries Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Database," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 34(2), pages 115-42, June.
  15. Jiandong Chen & Dai Dai & Ming Pu & Wenxuan Hou & Qiaobin Feng, 2010. "The trend of the Gini coefficient of China," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 10910, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  16. Kai-yuen Tsui, 2009. "Measurement of income mobility: a re-examination," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 629-645, November.
  17. Ding, Ning & Wang, Yougui, 2008. "Household income mobility in China and its decomposition," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 373-380, September.
  18. Mark Trede, 1999. "Statistical Inference for Measures of Income Mobility," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 218(3+4), pages 473-490, March.
  19. Shorrocks, A F, 1978. "The Measurement of Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 1013-24, September.
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