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Measuring mobility

Author

Listed:
  • Frank A. Cowell

    () (STICERD, London School of Economics)

  • Emmanuel Flachaire

    () (GREQAM, Aix-Marseille University)

Abstract

Our new approach to mobility measurement involves separating out the valuation of positions in terms of individual status (using income, social rank, or other criteria) from the issue of movement between positions. The quantification of movement is addressed using a general concept of distance between positions and a parsimonious set of axioms that characterise the distance concept and yield a class of aggregative indices. This class of indices induces a superclass of mobility measures over the different status concepts consistent with the same underlying data. We investigate the statistical inference of mobility indices using two well-known status concepts, related to income mobility and rank mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank A. Cowell & Emmanuel Flachaire, 2011. "Measuring mobility," Working Papers 199, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2011-199
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    File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2011-199.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2004. "The measurement of structural and exchange income mobility," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, pages 219-228.
    2. Van Kerm, Philippe, 2009. "Income mobility profiles," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 93-95, February.
    3. Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2004. "The measurement of structural and exchange income mobility," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, pages 219-228.
    4. Van de Gaer, Dirk & Schokkaert, Erik & Martinez, Michel, 2001. "Three Meanings of Intergenerational Mobility," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(272), pages 519-537, November.
    5. D'Agostino, Marcello & Dardanoni, Valentino, 2009. "The measurement of rank mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 144(4), pages 1783-1803, July.
    6. Philippe Van Kerm, 2004. "What Lies Behind Income Mobility? Reranking and Distributional Change in Belgium, Western Germany and the USA," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71(281), pages 223-239, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Walter Bossert & Burak Can & Conchita D’Ambrosio, 2016. "Measuring rank mobility with variable population size," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 46(4), pages 917-931, April.
    2. Yi Chen & Frank A. Cowell, 2017. "Mobility in China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, pages 203-218.
    3. Millimet, Daniel L. & Tchernis, Rusty, 2015. "Persistence in body mass index in a recent cohort of US children," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 157-176.
    4. Yoram Amiel & Michele Bernasconi & Frank Cowell & Valentino Dardanoni, 2015. "Do we value mobility?," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 44(2), pages 231-255, February.
    5. Rasul, Imran & Rogger, Daniel, 2013. "Management of bureaucrats and public service delivery: evidence from the Nigerian civil service," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58161, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mobility measures; axiomatic approach; bootstrap.;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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